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Comments

Comment reply on raymondzzd's Completed Build: My first SFF build in NCASE M1 v6

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

It looks nice! How hard was the RAM overclocking for you?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "860 EVO mSATA"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I meant that there's probably not too many people still buying the new drives as mSATA. They are still Samsung's newest drive at this level, so the performance is probably quite good.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "860 EVO mSATA"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I was looking at upgrading an old laptop, and the prices shown on PCPartPicker are all pretty high because they are the old, probably discontinued drives. Probably not many people still using these, but it would be nice to have the new ones on for price-tracking.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "HyperX FURY White 8GB 3200MHz DDR4 CL18 DIMM1Rx8 Memory"

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Something went wrong, the product page seems to be for a 2x16 GB (PN HX432C18FWK2/32) set, but the retail links are instead for the 1x8GB (HX432C18FW2/8) set. I think the original poster confused the configurations, since they link the spec sheet and product page for the 2x16 set, use the 1x8 product number, and use the 1x8 amazon link. Not a major issue, just surprised by a price alert I had set up :)

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: Portable "Workstation"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

You can sort of see it in the fifth picture. There is about another 12-15mm of space between the fans and the GPU. I've seen some people use thick fans (25mm) instead of the thin ones and then the GPU basically rests on the fan. I can take more pictures if that would help.

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: Portable "Workstation"

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

Haha, no I had it from the previous build I referred to.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1800 USD Gaming/streaming/multitasking"

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

That's correct. I was focusing on getting that in. The i5 should be fine for gaming. I think the bigger sacrifice may have been giving up on 16 GB of RAM, but for gaming, they should be fine. That's why I purposely used one stick, so they could easily upgrade this in the future. There's also an argument for a lower performance SSD combined with a HDD, which would end up being the same price as this pretty good NVMe drive. That basically comes down to how much storage they need though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building my first high-end desktop need major advice."

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

I guess I was also thinking about the potential of adding other accessories using the PCI bus. For example, they would probably end up with at least an NVMe drive. That said, I think it is a bit of a moot point, since for gaming only, the 7700k and a single graphics card is probably the best choice. The money you save could be put into upgrading sooner or something like that.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building my first high-end desktop need major advice."

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

I will try to answer your questions one by one:

  • Running graphics cards in SLI has questionable benefits, but if you have the money and want to do it, you can still go for it. This depends a lot on what monitor you plan on using, and whether the resolutions you play at require the added power of SLI.

  • If you decide you want to SLI for sure, the 6850k is the better choice. That said, purely for gaming the 7700k will actually be faster in most games because it has a higher per-core speed and a newer architecture.

  • Chipset wise, if you go for the 6850k, you have no choice but to go for a x99 motherboard. With the 7700k, you have more choices, but at this price point you should really go for a high end Z270 motherboard. If you use PCPartPicker, it will show you what is and is not compatible.

  • The H440 is a quality case, and will fit an SLI setup. In the future, you can find this by going to the part page of the case you are looking at, selecting "See all completed builds" near the bottom, and then sorting the resulting list by "SLI/Crossfire", which will show you previous builds. Again, PCPartPicker will give you a warning if something will not fit in the case you have chosen.

  • Finally, the highest refresh rates on current 4K monitors are only 60Hz, so you will not see any benefit from an average FPS much higher than 60 or so.

Best of luck with your build! If you have any questions, please ask away.

Tim

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1800 USD Gaming/streaming/multitasking"

  • 33 months ago
  • -2 points

Your description is a bit vague, but I still tried to make a build that fit: PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor $234.79 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler $34.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus PRIME Z270-A ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $157.98 @ NCIX US
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $57.88 @ OutletPC
Storage MyDigitalSSD BPX 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $209.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition Video Card $699.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $66.99 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.98 @ NCIX US
Monitor LG 29UM67P 29.0" 2560x1080 60Hz Monitor $229.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1772.48
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-04-11 23:36 EDT-0400

That said, I have some important questions: You mention being in Canada, but your budget is in USD, not CAD? PCPartPicker supports Canadian vendors and pricing if that is where you will end up buying this. The second question is what types of games you mostly play. This is important to the monitor selection. If you play mostly FPS and fast-twitch style games, it would probably be worth it to get a monitor with G-Sync, but it would have to be 24" and 1080p at this price point. If you play a larger variety of games, this monitor makes sense since it provides a lot of screen for the money.

If you have any questions, please ask.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Buy a whole new PC vs Add Components to play Civ 6"

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

Glad to help, pcpartpicker can be a great resource for this. If you take a peak through the build guides the staff publishes, they have recommended part list, and then also a video showing them building that part list. Take a look at this for example. Obviously other websites can also be a great help. There are countless Youtube tutorials, and Reddit has a variety of communities.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Buy a whole new PC vs Add Components to play Civ 6"

  • 38 months ago
  • 2 points

You certainly could upgrade the computer you have to play Civ 6. A new graphics card is the most obvious upgrade. Unfortunately, you need a half-height card or a riser. This leaves us with this card, but that hasn't been released yet, and looks to be around $150. Upgrading the processor is the next step. This should be easier, but you'll have to be okay with buying used. You could pick up a Core Core 2 Quad Q9650 for pretty cheap, and that should be a drop in replacement. These run for about $70 on ebay. The guide for the Dell 755 is accessible here and is a useful resource for checking compatibility. Note that you have the desktop configuration (DT) based on the Amazon listing.

With all that said, you would be upgrading a computer from almost ten years ago, maybe a questionable choice. I would personally go for building or buying a newer computer. Maybe you can use the Dell for office tasks elsewhere or resell it. Seeing as this is pcpartpicker, I'd encourage you to try and build your own computer. It is surprisingly easy, and there is a huge network of people out there eager to help. The obvious benefit is that you should be able to get more for your money. I would look at logicalincrements as a good starting point.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1800-$2000 PC Build for gaming and video editing."

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

I agree, there will be a difference with a higher refresh rate monitor, but I prefer multiple identical monitors (which works better for Nvidia Surround or AMD Eyefinity). This is of course a matter of personal preference. Color matching will also depend on whether you just want the cheapest components (i.e. cheapest 1070, cheapest motherboard, etc) or want a prettier build for more money. Of course you can always just get a case without a window and make the whole thing a moot point.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1800-$2000 PC Build for gaming and video editing."

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

So some more information could be helpful. For example, do you need the price of an operating system included? Also, do you have any preference about whether you want a mechanical keyboard or not. Do you need a WiFi adapter? You said you wanted two monitors, but you could also go with one 4k monitor. This would have the trade-off of requiring a more expensive graphics card.

I haven't done much video editing, so I can't recommend any software there. For photo editing, you'll want to use Lightroom. It is pretty much the only game in town, but is also really good. I use it myself, and found it easy to learn.

With that said, I made a sample build for you. I included lots of storage, a strong processor, and a relatively strong graphics card. These should all help with your video editing, and can't hurt gaming. You'll want IPS monitors for photo and video editing, so I included that as a criteria.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor $339.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler $29.90 @ Newegg
Motherboard Asus Z170-A ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $148.98 @ Amazon
Memory Kingston FURY 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $79.00 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 600p Series 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $96.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Toshiba P300 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $79.99 @ Newegg
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Video Card $404.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case NZXT S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $66.69 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor LG 29UM58-P 29.0" 75Hz Monitor $249.99 @ NCIX US
Monitor LG 29UM58-P 29.0" 75Hz Monitor $249.99 @ NCIX US
Keyboard AZIO MGK1 Wired Gaming Keyboard $59.99 @ Newegg
Mouse Logitech G502 Wired Optical Mouse $57.96 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1921.25
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-11-08 21:29 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Helping On Building a PC"

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

This would handle max everything settings for a few years at 1080p. To be honest, looking at some benchmarks and reviews, you should be fine moving down to a GTX 1060 or even a RX 480 and saving the money, assuming you plan to stick with that monitor in the future. If you see yourself moving to a higher resolution monitor in the future, the 1070 is a good choice. The $150 or 200 you save by moving down is definitely not a trivial amount, so I'd examine that closely.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Helping On Building a PC"

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

You could do something like the following. You didn't give any mention to whether or not you needed an OS or peripherals, so I didn't include those. Either way, this certainly provides a start point.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $194.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI B150M MORTAR Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $74.99 @ Amazon
Memory Kingston HyperX Fury Black 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $46.99 @ Newegg
Storage OCZ TRION 150 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $49.88 @ OutletPC
Storage Hitachi Deskstar 7K2000 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $48.95 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Video Card $404.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $24.99 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Newegg
Monitor Dell S2316M 23.0" 60Hz Monitor $89.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $995.66
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-11-07 15:26 EST-0500

Also not sure why you asked basically the same question twice, but this pretty much agrees with MisterJ's build. You're pretty much given the choice of going for a 1070 and going budget everything else, or going with a 1060 and having that money to use for other things.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$2500 part list for my friend"

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, pretty much just a why not have at this price point type of thing. You don't really sacrifice much or anything to get it. I guess you could go for an AIO water cooler if you saved money on the SSD, but that also has dubious benefits if you don't overclock. Really just a matter of choice.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$2500 part list for my friend"

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, this is pretty much what I came up with too. I moved to a slightly cheaper cooler and case and fit in an M.2 SSD. You'll definitely want a GSYNC monitor like myself and rosswalker have. Other than that, you can't quite fit in a X99 platform build with this budget, so the i&-6700K makes the most sense.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor $328.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H5 Ultimate 76.0 CFM CPU Cooler $46.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI Z170A SLI ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $97.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2800 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 950 PRO 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $184.99 @ B&H
Storage Hitachi Deskstar 7K2000 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.95 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1080 8GB GAMING X 8G Video Card $664.35 @ B&H
Case NZXT S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $66.69 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply SeaSonic 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $119.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $98.99 @ My Choice Software
Monitor Dell S2716DG 27.0" 144Hz Monitor $599.00 @ B&H
Keyboard Cooler Master Storm QuickFire Rapid Wired Gaming Keyboard $77.41 @ Amazon
Mouse Logitech G502 Wired Optical Mouse $59.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2470.21
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-10-24 17:10 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Build a pc for gaming/rendering/recording and work on graphic tablets. 800 dollar Budget"

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Depending on how much rendering you do and whether or not you want to do it professionally, an $800 budget isn't really enough. What you need to render a lot is a CPU with many cores (expensive Xeon) and/or a very powerful GPU (expensive Quadro). With that noted, some other comments:

The graphics tablet connects with USB, so it will work with basically any computer you buy or build.

Second, PCPartPicker currently doesn't support Microcenter as one of the merchants you can select. As such, I can give you an example build, but you'd have to go for similar alternatives if you can't find something at Microcenter.

With that said, here is a sample build you could use:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD FX-8350 4.0GHz 8-Core Processor $151.98 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler $34.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock 970M PRO3 Micro ATX AM3+/AM3 Motherboard $56.98 @ Newegg
Memory Avexir Core Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory $64.88 @ OutletPC
Storage OCZ TRION 150 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $65.80 @ Amazon
Storage Hitachi Ultrastar 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $53.00 @ Amazon
Video Card Zotac GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB Mini Video Card $244.98 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $38.99 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $82.99 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $794.48
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-10-08 15:35 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "£1200 photo editing PC"

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

You could go for something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor £259.00 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-B150M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard £65.99 @ Amazon UK
Memory Kingston FURY 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-2133 Memory £132.49 @ Amazon UK
Storage Samsung 950 PRO 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £172.41 @ Amazon UK
Storage Toshiba 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £69.97 @ CCL Computers
Storage Toshiba 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £69.97 @ CCL Computers
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB Mini ITX OC Video Card £229.54 @ More Computers
Case Fractal Design Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case £38.57 @ Ebuyer
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply £70.97 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit £85.88 @ More Computers
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1194.79
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-10-08 19:24 BST+0100

If you didn't need the OS, you could add in more storage. I also don't know how your workflow is, so I wasn't sure if you'd want a card reader or not, but those are pretty cheap. Otherwise, as you can see, the focus for Adobe software (which I assume you are using) is on having a lot of memory and a solid CPU.

Random side-note: this is one of the very few PSUs to have gotten a perfect 10 from jonnyguru.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "<$1000 PC Build"

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

http://pcpartpicker.com/list/V4x2xY

Hmm, by moving down to a B150 series motherboard, you can save quite a bit of money, which can then go into the power supply (which is now twice as expensive, but fully modular and slightly better reviewed). Also, by moving to mATX you manage to save money on the case, which can then be put into a better wifi dongle and slightly better CPU. Obviously an interesting trade-off to make, but something which would probably also match the OP's use case pretty well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "<$1000 PC Build"

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Fair points, I went for the motherboard for the features and option of using an unlocked CPU in the future. The power supply is fine. I agree with you on the WAN, but wanted to stay in budget. You could definitely spend like 10-20 dollars more and get something much better.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "<$1000 PC Build"

  • 40 months ago
  • 2 points

What about this system:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6500 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $198.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $104.89 @ OutletPC
Memory Crucial 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage OCZ TRION 150 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $43.30 @ Amazon
Storage Hitachi Deskstar 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $43.00 @ Amazon
Video Card Zotac GeForce GTX 1060 6GB Mini Video Card $249.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $39.89 @ OutletPC
Power Supply EVGA 430W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply $32.00 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $85.70 @ My Choice Software
Wireless Network Adapter TP-Link TL-WN725N USB 2.0 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi Adapter $7.97 @ Amazon
Monitor Acer R240HY bidx 23.8" 60Hz Monitor $129.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1000.60
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-09-24 19:27 EDT-0400

Also, whoever downvoted, I'd love to hear your reasoning...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "600 Budget build including an os"

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

You could go for something like this, but it would be really helpful if you gave some more information, specifically whether or not you wanted the operating system included. Other things like whether or not you need a CD drive could also be helpful.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor $110.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $46.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $35.98 @ Newegg
Storage OCZ TRION 150 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $39.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB GAMING Video Card $199.99 @ Amazon
Case Rosewill FBM-05 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $24.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic 360W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply $53.99 @ SuperBiiz
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $85.70 @ My Choice Software
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $598.61
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-09-21 22:13 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$700 Budget"

  • 40 months ago
  • 2 points

What about this? It cuts some corners on the monitor and case, but otherwise should be fine.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz Dual-Core Processor $110.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $46.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $35.98 @ Newegg
Storage OCZ TRION 150 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $39.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB GAMING Video Card $199.99 @ Amazon
Case Rosewill FBM-05 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $26.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic 360W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply $53.99 @ SuperBiiz
Optical Drive Asus DRW-24F1ST DVD/CD Writer $13.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $85.70 @ My Choice Software
Monitor Sceptre E225W-1920 22.0" 60Hz Monitor $89.05 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $703.54
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-09-20 14:06 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "DUAL MONITORS w/ different resolutions? HELP"

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

You can use Nvidia Surround, but it will scale down to your lowest resolution monitor.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "4k for $3500?"

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, case choice is more or less just what look what you prefer. It also looks like my build and MisterJ's build pretty much are a choice between SLI'd graphics cards or a single graphics card, again sort of a personal preference. You can't really go wrong either way.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "4k for $3500?"

  • 41 months ago
  • 1 point

How about this. It is a touch over budget. I went for a blackout color scheme, but this is really just personal preference, it would really help if you said what you wanted.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor $324.99 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler NZXT Kraken X61 106.1 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $114.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus SABERTOOTH Z170 MARK 1 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $239.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4-2800 Memory $159.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung 950 PRO 512GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $315.62 @ B&H
Video Card Asus GeForce GTX 1080 8GB STRIX Video Card (2-Way SLI) $629.99 @ SuperBiiz
Video Card Asus GeForce GTX 1080 8GB STRIX Video Card (2-Way SLI) $629.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ATX Glass ATX Mid Tower Case $189.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic Platinum 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $168.99 @ SuperBiiz
Monitor Asus PG27AQ 27.0" 60Hz Monitor $812.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3587.42
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-09-04 23:55 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Rate my setup before I buy it?"

  • 41 months ago
  • 2 points

You definitely want a SSD if you can fit it in your budget. The hard drive you choose is relatively slow (5900 RPM), they also make 7200 RPM hard drives if you want to stick with that. Something like this.

It is also more readable if you paste your parts list formatted, just click on the links next to the word "markup" on the system build page.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Questions on a build"

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

I personally have a Hyper 212 cooling an i7-5820k and it does fine. Also, you might be able to find an open box motherboard at your local MicroCenter, which can be around $50 cheaper, if you want to consider that.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Son's 3D animation etc Build - Budget up tp $2,000"

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Some background: I'm a college student studying engineering, which places similar loads on a computer (we do a lot of 3D design and some rendering).

I agree with what xPat said, especially with regards to moving up to an x99 build. A lot of the rendering software still can't use a GPU, so how quickly stuff renders is entirely dependent on CPU power. This is one of those cases where more cores is better, which gives x99 setups an advantage. For the rendering engines that do support it, using a powerful GPU is much faster. I'm not really sure how professional (workstation) cards compare to consumer cards in this aspect. If anything, the workstation GPUs will have better driver support with professional software, but they often cost much more. Like xPat mentioned, you can sometimes get really good deals on previous generation professional hardware, since they have pretty quick refresh cycles, so they may be something to look into. Something like they did here would be excellent at rendering, at the cost of using somewhat obscure parts and having higher power consumption.

Just as an example, keeping it with the same parts except to move to the better platform, the build could look something like 2nd Attempt

Also, just to throw out there as a thought, I built my own computer in a similarly sized case, something that I now regret. My college is far enough from home that I have to fly back and forth, which means I can't bring my computer home for the summer since it can't fit in carry-on. In hindsight, I should have built mITX setup that I could fit in a suitcase and bring with me wherever I go.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "asrock X99 ITX motherboard and cooler compatibility issues"

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Just want to mention that this is still a problem. I was just looking at slim coolers with that motherboard, and the R25 is still shown as not compatible.

Comment reply on Brood550's Build Guide: MSI Build Your Dream PC Guide - "4K killer"

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah, sorry that includes a mail in rebate, I seem to have missed that. This whole pricing thing is a little dumb. I like your build though. A little much spent on non-core components for me, but nice choices.

Comment reply on Brood550's Build Guide: MSI Build Your Dream PC Guide - "4K killer"

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Just a heads up, looks like the power supply jumped in price, bring you to just over $2000.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Official MSI Build Guide Contest Thread"

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

That could well be it, since it only uses in store pricing if you are close enough to a store. For example, your build shows the SSD and CPU with in store pricing for me, but I assume probably doesn't for you. Still no idea on the legality of this, we'll see if Manirelli chimes in, otherwise I'll message him.

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: The Most Generic Build Ever

  • 48 months ago
  • 2 points

Pretty high at rest (like 35), up to about 60ish I think. I haven't felt the need for any overclock yet. I'm also away from the computer for the near future, but I'll update the build and reply to this comment with actual temperatures when I physically return to it. In case you are planning on using it for a build, it works fine, and others say it worked fine for them too, even with some overclocking.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Official MSI Build Guide Contest Thread"

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, I just had a discussion with someone on the build about this, it looks like the problem stems from your settings not allowing all merchants, or including tax at some merchants. For example, my build uses Microcenter pricing to save on the CPU and bring the price to about $1985. I believe this is legal, but any clarification would be great.

Comment reply on theonetim's Build Guide: MSI Build Your Dream PC Guide – “The SLI Challenge”

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds good, thanks for the concern.

Comment reply on theonetim's Build Guide: MSI Build Your Dream PC Guide – “The SLI Challenge”

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Not sure where you are seeing that? The total shows as $1985.34 for me. Are you sure you have all your merchants enabled? That could be the problem since this takes advantage of a Microcenter deal (I think that's legal...)

Comment reply on SnowFlakeZ's Build Guide: MSI Build Your Dream PC Guide - The Yeti Awakened

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks good, I like the dedication to the color scheme (the cooler and motherboard would look really good together). Just one thing, you mention that the power supply would be fine for upgrading to two cards. I wouldn't be so sure about that, check the wattage estimates, another card puts you right at the limit of the power supply. You have a lot of money left to play around with so maybe you could upgrade to a power supply with higher wattage? I know the EVGA G2 series is otherwise really good.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Official MSI Build Guide Contest Thread"

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

My build

I tried to go for something a little different and manage a 980Ti SLI setup. I'm really curious to see what people think of the compromises that had to be made to fit that into the budget, and look forward to comments :)

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: The Most Generic Build Ever

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

They turn off automatically when the computer is on (the lights are on when the computer is plugged in but off). I can double check this if you're really curious, but I'm not currently with my computer so it could be a while.

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: The Most Generic Build Ever

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks.

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: The Most Generic Build Ever

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. My college is really small, so we each get our own large drafting table in the back of our classroom to work at.

Comment reply on theonetim's Completed Build: The Most Generic Build Ever

  • 49 months ago
  • 1 point

I guess so, I'll have to mention that to my friend, who did that (i5 + 970). He did build it in an NCASE, so I guess he gets some creativity points there.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Itunes alternative?"

  • 61 months ago
  • 2 points

I second MusicBee. After extensive searching I decided on it. Now after around 3 years of using it ,I'm still impressed by it. It also has a dedicated developer, and extensive customization.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Graphics card decision"

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Like the other commenter mentioned, a ~650W would work fine.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Graphics card decision"

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, the RAT mice certainly aren't for everyone. Razer is a nice brand though, I've pretty much only heard good things about them. That CPU shouldn't have any bottlenecking issues with either setup. Either card should run games fine by itself on the monitor you have now, so for games where SLI is not supported, you'll have to do that, but it shouldn't be an issue for a while. SLI also looks more impressive, IMHO. If you plan on waiting a while to get another monitor, you could juts get one better card now, and then wait until prices come down or the used market opens up to buy a second one to go with your new monitor. Another commenter mentioned your power supply being a bit underpowered, and I tend to agree. A power supply can last multiple builds, so you can get a bit of a better one.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Graphics card decision"

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

It should be pretty easy, you basically connect the bridge while building the computer, and then enable SLI in the drivers. You are correct that performance doesn't quite scale linearly. If you want to go multimonitor, SLI could be better. If you stick to one, a single card is probably better. Also, for mouse recommendations, I've always had good luck with Logitech things, but I haven't tried their gaming products myself. I also have two friends with R.A.T mice who both really like them, but the looks are polarizing and I've read about some reliability problems on the internet, so who knows.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Graphics card decision"

  • 64 months ago
  • 1 point

Here is a link that compares benchmarks for both: http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_980_SLI/20.html In your case, a single 980 would probably be fine. That way you could upgrade it later. SLI'd 970s would get you a bit more performance, but at a higher cost and more complexity. They do however have the best performance per dollar. Any reason you want that particular 980? The ASUS reference design is $60 cheaper.

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