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Comments

Comments

Comment reply on black4's Completed Build: The Box

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 for another Haf XB'er

Comment reply on WaffleWarrior's Completed Build: Black Magic

  • 73 months ago
  • 2 points

I'll give +1 for the fact that he/she has given a nice presentation for the parts used, ie cable management, etc. Granted I'm not sure about the use of a locked CPU with a Z_series board, 1TB of SSDs and 4TB of HDD, but to each there own and well done for what is there.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 8.1 password screen crashes"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

No worries. I had all sorts of problems when I built my first. Glad to see you got it figured out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Windows 8.1 password screen crashes"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I see that no one has responded to your issue. Have you resolved it or do you still need help?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PSU Trouble Please help"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

This may be obvious but make sure the on/off toggle switch on the back is flipped to on.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NO POST. Continuous beep .Please help. i5 4670 GA-B85M-D3H Corsair Vengeance 1X4GB Seasonic 512II 520W PSU"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Glad you have it figured out. Faulty ram modules are unfortunately a very common problem, but once you have a good one they are likely to last a very long time.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget gaming build $700 budget"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I would change a few things.

If a budget is a concern you could go with and AMF FX 8320/6350. Not a huge drop in performance and will save you some money.

Go with a dual channel kit. 2 sticks at 4GB each is a lot faster than 1 stick at 8GB. If you're doing this because of trying to "future proof," don't. With a budget build, heck even higher end builds, 8GB is plenty for gaming. I've run games with multiple applications running in the background and have yet to go over 4GB. Plus, you may not be able to find a matching second stick when you get to the upgrading point. An 8GB dual channel kit is also about the same price as the single channel kit you picked out.

Use the money you saved from buying an 8320/6350 and put it towards a better power supply. The wattage you have picked out is fine. In fact its probably a little much for the 750ti since it takes its power directly from the motherboard. Get a better name, ie Corsair, EVGA, Seasonic, XFX. Bottom line is that poor quality power supplies are the number one reason for system failure.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "complete new-comer, help!"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

The reason its not showing up is because you have an 1155 Z77 motherboard selected. Erase the CPU and the motherboard from your list and start with the Intel 4670k and the site will bring up the appropriate 1150 Z87 boards.

Yes you would have fast boot times and application start up times and standard file loading times. As far as separating the storage between the SSD and HDD it's easy. Almost every program has the ability in the settings to change the default storage or installation directory to what every you want.

As far as some of the comments below, I caution you about buying a second set of memory. If, as you stated, you will be using this for mid-range gaming and work/netflix you will not need more than 8GB. I've run games with multiple background applications and have yet to go over 4GB.

Having more memory will absolutely not give you a performance boost, unless of course you actually need it. And in fact, you may see a decrease in memory performance with four sticks. Reason being is that all Z series boards, whether they are Z77, or the newer Z87, only have a dual channel memory controller. When you have two sticks of memory each channel has direct access to one memory module. If you put in four sticks of memory now each channel has to split its resource time between jumping back and forth between two sticks of memory.

Its not a huge decrease in performance, but it will definitely not improve your performance unless you are actually using it.

If you really think you need/want four sticks then go with LGA 2011 X79 motherboard. They have quad channel memory controller. But if you're just gaming it would be a waste of money.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "complete new-comer, help!"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

The build looks fine as it is. The only things I will recommend, and this depends on price and availability where you live.

-Go for a 4670k, its the newer version and an updated socket.

-With respect to the SSD, the EVO versions of Samsung SSDs are generally cheaper then the PRO, but again this depends on where you live.

Now this part is my opinion only, I recommend going with 120GB SSD, for the OS and main applications, and a HDD for file storage. The reason for this is 120GB ssds are cheaper than the 240GB versions and the 240GB version are a size that, at least for me, is to big for just the OS and applications, with a lot of wasted space, but not large enough for the OS, applications, and file storage. Particularly if you download a lot of games, movies, etc.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NO POST. Continuous beep .Please help. i5 4670 GA-B85M-D3H Corsair Vengeance 1X4GB Seasonic 512II 520W PSU"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

To minimize possible trouble point I recommend the following;

External build on a non-conductive surface

-Place the motherboard on a non-conductive surface. The motherboard box works well

-Install CPU and CPU cooler. Ensure that the CPU fan is plugged into the CPU fan header on the motherboard

-Install at least one stick of memory into the first available primary slot. Typically slots 2 and 4 are primary, but not always. Check you motherboard manual.

-Connect the monitor to one of the video outputs on the motherboard.

-With the PSU NOT plugged into a wall outlet, connect the 24 pin motherboard and the 8 pin CPU power connectors.

-Connect the PSU to a wall oulet.

-Jump the motherboard via the power pins.

At this point with this set up you should at least be able to get into the BIOS. If you are not able to get into the BIOS then there are a few things you can try.

-Test boot with the memory in a different slot.

-Test boot with a different stick of memory.

If you have already tested the PSU and have tried all of the above then I would say there is a very good chance your motherboard is DOA.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is 430W PSU enough for a 374W build?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

It close but it will work. Just keep in mind that if you want to upgrade in the future to X-fire or to a higher GPU then it will not be enough and you will have to upgrade the PSU as well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Gaming Build"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

First off, you have a locked cpu (non-overclockable) paired with a Z-series (overclockable) motherboard. It will work just fine together, but its a waste of money. Either go with a K-series CPU (overclockable) and a Z-series motherboard (overclockable) or a non-K series CPU with an H-series motherboard.

If you go the non-overclocking route the stock cooler will work just fine, albeit a bit loud at full load.

As far as wireless goes you will need a wireless adapter as your currently selected motherboard does not have integrated WIFI. You can go the USB or PCI route. Both work just fine.

As far as OS goes, either pay for the OS or get a legitimate free one, Ubuntu, FreeBSD etc. Don't try and work around paying for Windows. If your going to be doing mostly gaming just go for Windows as many AAA title do not have Linux ports. Yes, there are ways to get around that but IMO its more of a pain than its worth.

As far as the monitor goes I had an ASUS VH238H and I really liked it.

The rest of your build looks fine.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Am I going to need Water-Cooling?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Not to tell you where to spend your money, and I don't know what you intend for this build, but 1k on mobo/cpu seems like way way overkill. Other than that no, for a very mild overclock like 4 GHz a good air cooler will do fine.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Advice of any sort on this preliminary build?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

This is very true. Any savings is better than no savings. I also love higher than bronze for the extra build quality. I think gold is the sweet spot. The few platinum units that are out there don't offer much over the golds IMO.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget Build, Kind of."

  • 73 months ago
  • 2 points

The way it works is like this, everything initially gets installed to the HDD portion of the drive first. The controller inside the drive determines that after file Y gets accessed X number of times it will start to cache those file/s to the SSD portion of the drive in a RAID format. Any changes that are made to file Y are made to both the Y files on the SSD version and the Y files HDD version.

The controller does not take long to figure out which files need to be cached to the SSD portion.

In all the reviews I've read SSHD's do not fall that far behind SSD's. The difference between them is so small that in a double blind test most user were unable to tell tell the difference in real world use.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Advice of any sort on this preliminary build?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I agree that Gold is better but from the way I understand it is that efficiency ratings are at 50% load and efficiency drops after that. In the long run the money you save in bronze vs gold/platinum will pay for the step up but it is minimal. If I'm wrong please correct me so I don't pass along incorrect info.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget Build, Kind of."

  • 73 months ago
  • 2 points

I understand that, but what I was saying is that installing some programs to a drive or partition other than the boot drive/partition can be problematic. If you want to keep under 140 for storage I would go with a hybrid drive. It will cache the most commonly accessed files, OS, steam, etc, to the attached 8GB SSD and you will have plenty of room for extra files.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget Build, Kind of."

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

If you can find a 120Hz monitor at a great price then yes go for it. I switched from a 60 to 144 and to be honest the visual difference was minimal and not worth the extra price.

Personally, with the 280X I would rather have higher settings at 60Hz then lower settings to get >60Hz. For example, on most game I can set the presets to high/ultra and get 50-60 FPS and it looks a lot better than when I set the presets to med/high to get 70-120Hz.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build- Future Proofing"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

OK. With your build you should be able to do that. I did not see an OS on your list so keep this in mind as many people don't realize this; if you buy an OEM version of an OS you will not be able to change your motherboard without buying a new OS for a new license. With that said you may not be able to change the CPU either because, generally, a new CPU requires an updated socket or chipset. I would recommend a full retail version of an OS. Just some food for thought.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "*Corsair h100i for trade*"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not up for trading mine, but the Dark Rock Pro 2 is awesome. Keeps my I5 OC'd to 4.5 cool to about 60-65 max load. And it is so quite I can't hear it unless I put my ear to the top of the cooler, even at 100% speed.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best free firewall?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

MS Security Essential and MalwarBytes. Both are free and when used in concert are very effective and minimally invasive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget Build, Kind of."

  • 73 months ago
  • 2 points

The build looks fine. The only thing I would suggest is going with a 120GB SSD or a 1TB SSHD (Solis State Hybrid Drive.) That 60GB will fill up extremely fast and when it does installing some programs/applications to drives other than the boot drive can be problematic.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build- Future Proofing"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

That is an excellent choice for a PSU. It will cover almost any single card. When you say "uprade" what do you mean? What parts are you thinking of upgrading?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Just a Question"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Your build looks fine with the exception of the memory. Take advantage of dual channel. 2@4GB will be faster than 1@8GB. You could go with this. Its a dual channel kit and about the same price.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Max 2g's gaming what would you do?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Just FYI, most people here are going to want you to do the leg work and pick your own parts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build, Need Opinions"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Suggestions;

CPU. Since you have a discrete GPU picked out I would go for a quad core CPU vs a dual core APU. I think you would have a much stronger system using something like an AMD Athlon X4 740, which is very close to the price point of your APU, or an FX-4130, which would be even better and still keep you under your 500 price point.

Memory. Take advantage of dual channel. You will see the difference. I would go with something like this. Its a dual channel kit and not much more that your single stick. Since you are going to be doing your graphics processing on your discrete GPU and not your APU (if you go that route) you will not notice a difference in 1600MHz vs 1833MHz.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ratri - My First PC Build"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

The build looks fine. The only thing I would suggest is going with the FX 6350. It's not too much more and starts 400 MHz faster.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build- Future Proofing"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Your build looks fine. The only thing I would suggest is going for the Hyper 212 Evo. Its the updated 212 Plus and out performs it in many tests. Plus its about the same price. If you are planning on upgrading things like you GPU, either with SLI or moving to a higher card, keep in mind that your PSU is only 550W. This will work for the 760, but does not meet the system requirements for any higher card or the SLI of any set of cards, even the 760's.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Advice of any sort on this preliminary build?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

It all looks good. The few things I would suggest;

CPU. Go for an unlocked processor and a Z series board. I wasn't going to go the unlocked/overclocking route either when I did my first build, but I'm glad I did. It was a lot of fun learning about overclocking and how it all works.

GPU. MSI is a good supplier of hardware and a fine choice. If there is a chance you may try your hand at water cooling in the future the only thing to consider is that MSI used a non-reference board with their 700 series and there are no full cover water blocks made for them. Just FYI.

PSU. Seasonic is probably one of the best names for PSU suppliers, obviously with a few other, ie Corsair, some XFX, PC Power and Cooling etc. Just keep in mind that with that model 520W is at apx 100% load and the minimum recommended power supply, according to Nvidia spec sheet, is 600w. Although I think they overestimate a bit, I would not feel comfortable with only 520W.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Yet another build list revision. Brace for impact."

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds good. Hope I could help.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Yet another build list revision. Brace for impact."

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

True the brown color scheme used by Noctua is not for most people. With the Phanteks blocking the ram, the front fan can be set higher to allow for more clearance, but this will make the cooler's total height taller as well, which could lead to case compatibility issues.

When I put my first build together I wanted to do an all Cooler Master build, but if I remember some of the reviews, single tower coolers with fans in push/pull out scored the V8 with only one fan.

In reference to the SSD size, its my opinion to go with 120GB, for OS and Main applications, with file storage to a traditional HDD, or with an SSD >500GB. The reason being is that 250GB is too big for just the OS and main applications, unless you have a lot of them, but not big enough for OS, applications and file storage. It will just fill up too fast.

My recommendation until 500GB SSD's get cheaper is to stick with an SSD/HDD combo. With the OS and applications on the SSD you will get fast application performance and OS loading and have plenty of room for file storage. Or you can look into SSHD (Solid State Hybrid Drives.)

As far as the Windows OEM locking goes;

Its my understanding that with OEM versions, Microsoft considers the motherboard to be the "heart" of the PC and since OEM versions are designed to be sold to companies like Dell HP etc they only allow for it to be licensed to 1 PC. When you change the "heart" of the PC you have in effect created a "new" PC. What that means for private builders like us is that when you want to change your motherboard, or your motherboard goes bad, it has to be replaced with the same make and model board to be used with the same OEM license.

Full retail versions of the OS allow for multiple licenses and license transferals. As far as I know ever place that sells OEM versions should also sell retail versions.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How does this build look?"

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

The build looks fine. The only thing I will play devils advocate about is the I7 and the amount of ram. Yes, the I7 has hyperthreading and is a little bit better with multi-threaded applications, but how much is it worth to you given the fact that using an I5 on these types of applications is still a very good performaer? If you have the budget for and you want it then go for it. But if money is a concern, as it is for most of us, then the extra 100$ would be better spent on something else or saved for future upgrades.

On the subject of the amount of RAM, I would evaluate how much and when you are doing your editing/stacking. If you are running it in the background while you are gaming then yes the 16GB and I7 are advisable. But if you're not then an I5 and 8GB would still work very well and give you more for you dollar.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Yet another build list revision. Brace for impact."

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I like your build. I think you have made some solid choices on the parts for your intended use. The only thing I have to be critical of is the following;

CPU cooler. I would advise getting one that has a dual fan set up. For example, Noctua NH-D14/D-15, Phanteks PH-TC14PE, Be Quite Dark Rock Pro 2/3. These are all solid choices and will give you much better performance that the cooler master one.

GPU. The 770 is a fine choice, but be aware that "if" you choose to go the water cooling route in the future that MSI used a non-reference board with their 700 series card and full cover blocks are not yet made for them. Maybe in the future but I doubt it. Just an FYI.

SSD. The samsung drive is fine, but if you plan on using it for the OS, CAD, games, etc, etc it will fill up very fast with 120 gb. Especially given the fact that most newer games are pushing the 20GB file size and CAD file can grow rather large as well depending on the size of the project. I have my games on an HDD and true the game takes a bit longer to load, by all of 15-20 sec, once it is loaded it runs just has fast as SSD loaded games. Again, FYI.

OS. Your choice of win 7 vs 8.1 is fine, I choose 7 over 8 as well. I would advise against the OEM version though. Yes it is cheaper, but once you register the OS it becomes locked to that motherboard. If you want to upgrade your board in the future you will have to by a whole new OS.

Other than those FYI's I think your build looks fine.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help with an annoying boot issue!"

  • 74 months ago
  • 2 points

Ok. If it boots into safe mode with no issues I'm inclined to say that it is a software issue.

Before we move further though I would like you to test your memory with memtest86+ (http://www.memtest.org/#downiso) choose the second download and boot to that to test. If you have already done this then disregard. Faulty memory is a very common problem.

This is how I would proceed.

1) Clean install of windows 2) Update windows 3) Begin to install third part drivers and software.

In between each of the steps and in between each driver install create a restore point and thoroughly test your booting issue. Because I believe this is a software issue and not a hardware issue, I fell it is one of the drivers that is causing the problem. Theoretically you should be able to install windows, update windows, and at some point during the installation of the third party drivers you will get to the point where you are once again experiencing the booting issue. Once you do and you revert to the restore point before the last install you will know what is causing the problem.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard issues?"

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds good. Glad you got it figured out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How is it all connected?"

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds good. Glad you got it figured out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard issues?"

  • 74 months ago
  • 2 points

Yes, as stated below, you need mainboard power and cpu power.

Comment reply on bradenfontaine's Completed Build: Budget gaming

  • 74 months ago
  • 2 points

+1 for the build. For sub 600 it looks fine.

Comment reply on dylanweber's Completed Build: My Best Effort

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Just make your own. I had one of those NZXT strips and it was crap. Put together my own and it looks and works a whole lot better. +1 on the build, it looks good.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How is it all connected?"

  • 74 months ago
  • 3 points

I'm not sure i understand your question but,

each of your components with require a separate power and data connection. All drives will require power, via a SATA power connection from the PSU, and data, via a SATA data cable attached to your motherboard. The drives can be connected to any of you available SATA ports on you motherboard.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help with an annoying boot issue!"

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Is this issue only happening while booting up the system? If you have a successful boot do you have any problems after that?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard issues?"

  • 74 months ago
  • 2 points

Well, first thing first,

Start with an external build with only the essentials connected to test for basic functionality. If your motherboard is already in the case then you may choose to leave it there, but check to ensure that there are no loose screws that may shorting out the motherboard, and make sure that all the motherboard standoffs are properly installed.

Connect/install only the following;

CPU CPU cooler At least one stick of memory into the first available primary slot Monitor connected to one of the motherboard video outputs With the PSU NOT plugged into a wall outlet, attach the 20+4/24 pin mainboard power connector and the 4/8 pin CPU power connector Plug the PSU into a wall outlet Turn on the "skeleton" system

With this setup you should be able to at least get into the BIOS and check for core component functionality.

Are you able to do this?

Comment reply on manzir's Completed Build: Entire setup

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm torn on this post. Although I can appreciate the desire to show off a tech collection, I feel the main purpose of this site is to show off a single build not everything you've managed to pull together over the years. With that said, I appreciate the fact that you at least spent the time and energy to give a good presentation of your parts and did not just snap a few cell phone pictures of a big pile of $h!t thrown together. So, +1

Comment reply on salgio's Completed Build: If you call it a beast,Im taking it away from you!

  • 74 months ago
  • 3 points

Contrary to some of the comments above, I think this is a great starter build for an 11 year old. If I got a gift like this for my birthday when I was eleven I would have been very happy. Well done. Everything here provides a solid foundation on which many upgrades can be added in the future.+1

Comment reply on salgio's Completed Build: If you call it a beast,Im taking it away from you!

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

I agree. For a starter build for an 11 year old I think this is well done.

Comment reply on dpfronczak's Completed Build: Beast PC Update

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

Up vote for the parts and presentation.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "mother board blinking"

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

First, what MOBO are you working on? Also, what other parts are attached? Is this a new build? A little more description of your problem will be helpful, ie start to end.

My first thought is that you are using an Intel board and outputing the video signal via a video card without changing the BIOS setting. By default intel boards are set to output the video signal via the iGPU on the CPU. You need to go into the BIOS and change it from iGPU to Peripheral PGU output.

The first thing I always recommend is to start with the basics;

Clear your CMOS, via a reset switch or removing the CMOS batteries for 10-30 seconds

External build on a non-conductive surface Attach/install only the following CPU CPU cooler Memory

Connect your monitor via the motherboard video output of your choice

Connect the PSU and power on your system

With this set up you should be able to get into your BIOS.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "7870 Crashing Often"

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

My first suspect would be the psu. It's either not giving enough power or there is a short in the cable or connector supplying power.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First time/New builder - No video when i first boot computer"

  • 74 months ago
  • 1 point

OK. Lets start with the basics to troubleshoot any possible issues.

First lets do an external build. Some of these instructions you may or may have not done, but follow them anyways.

  1. Place the motherboard on a non-conductive surface.
  2. Install CPU
  3. Apply thermal paste, install CPU cooler, and connect the CPU cooler fan to the CPU fan header on the motherboard
  4. Install at least one stick of memory into the first available primary memory slot. Typically slots 2 and 4 are primary, but not always.
  5. Insert the video card.
  6. Connect the video card to the monitor with the cable of your choice, ie HDMI, DVI, ect
  7. Turn on the monitor to ensure that the input selected on the monitor matches the output type from the video card, ie HDMI, DVI, ect
  8. With the PSU NOT plugged into a wall outlet connect the 24-pin mainboard power cable, the 8 pin CPU power cable, and the video power cable.
  9. Plug the PSU into a wall outlet and ensure that the on/off toggle switch on the rear of the PSU is switched to the on position.
  10. Turn on the motherboard via an on-board button or shorting the power pins.

With this set up you should be able to at least see the BIOS flash screen and enter the bios. Are you able to do this?

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