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Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: X399 & 1950X Ryzen Threadripper ROG Black Build With RGB

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

yes, I try to provide some additional information regarding the components if someone is interested. still have some additional photos of the process of the build to post as well.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: X399 & 1950X Ryzen Threadripper ROG Black Build With RGB

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

My badge comes from the fact I work for ASUS. Part of ensuring clarity in my position and posts.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: X399 & 1950X Ryzen Threadripper ROG Black Build With RGB

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! Appreciate the kudos. It may pop on the social channel as I have shared it with the social team ( as noted in my profile I do work for ASUS ).

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: X399 & 1950X Ryzen Threadripper ROG Black Build With RGB

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! Appreciate the kudos. I do agree I really like the look of the PRIMERA chassis it has a nice balance of visibility with the mesh and lighting but still offers great airflow and the angle lines break up a box feel a bit and of course, you have the requisite tempered glass side panel.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "need a MOBO to go with my i7-8700k and i cant tell which of these is the best choice"

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are concerned about power, kudos many enthusiasts assume that just because their electrical outlet works they do not have noise or feedback or any other number of issues that can affect stability, functionality and much more. Consider a line conditioner. If you are going to go with a UPS Cyberpower Sine units are solid a little more expensive but worth the investment and additionally offered better protection than the cheap MOV based PDS strips out that most purchase.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: White Themed Z370 Gaming Build - ASUS Z370-A, Intel Coffe Lake 8600K & STRIX GTX 1080

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

Weird my write up is no longer there for this system. I will need to go back and check my notes. I can tell you the fans are AURA SYNC supported. As to the exact control configuration and specifics i will double check the config and get back to you.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: White Themed Z370 Gaming Build - ASUS Z370-A, Intel Coffe Lake 8600K & STRIX GTX 1080

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

I add some additional lighting via strips but have not looked to see if I can remove the addressable LED strip used in the ENSO. As it is one of the key reasons to get this chassis I see no reason to change it. As to your question are you asking how I set up the airflow?

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Full RGB AMD Ryzen 5 Gaming Build ( Red & Black ) - Ryzen 5 1600 , STRIX B350-F & STRIX RX 580

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Can you clarify your OC question? Do you mean stock in regards to the stock cooler?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus Prime Z370-A Vs. MSI Z370 GAMING PRO CARBON"

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

No problem. Hope it was of help!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mirco ATX B350 Motherboard"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Best of luck with! Make sure you flash/update the UEFI once you have the board.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: White Themed Z370 Gaming Build - ASUS Z370-A, Intel Coffe Lake 8600K & STRIX GTX 1080

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Glad you liked it. Think there are still some elements to improve upon but I am happy with how it turned out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can someone find a Z370 mobo with 8 4pin Fan Headers, 4 sata ports, 2 M.2 slots, and good overclocking"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry, no discount possible. I will tell you for me even when I buy ASUS hardware I purchase online directly. Just like a user I look for good deals whether it be promo pricing, rebates etc.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Itx motherboards?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Technically yes but you would still need a GPU / graphics card. Neither board features integrated display out connections. This makes sense for 2200G which is replacing an entry Ryzen 3 part but for the 2400G it makes more sense to consider this part with a board that offers display out whether it be mATX or ATX ( if you are looking at ASUS ).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Itx motherboards?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Itx motherboards?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Sure,

Both of these are great. I have personally used them in builds.

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-B350-I-GAMING/

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-X370-I-GAMING/

Let me know if you have more questions.

Please enjoy the rest of your day!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Z370?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I would check out a recent breakdown I provided to someone who asked about a comparison to the Gaming Pro Carbon. This may be of use to you.

I make the statement up front it is a lot to read through but if you want clear distinctive differences it is worth it. I also am an ASUS employee but have structured the feedback to focus on technical differences, not perceived differences. Hope this helps!

So this is an interesting comparison as you are not comparing price to price, technically the comparison to the CARBON would be the STRIX Z370-E or F. Although the -A is a very good board and offer a number features that are not offered on the CARBON. With that noted, I do work for ASUS so I am biased but will present only technical differences which are concrete.

The M.2 design is superior on ASUS board. Our heatsink design is a actual true bonded heatsink with thermal pad material as opposed to the plate design used by MSI. Furthermore, we prioritize zones for best thermal performance. This is why both the -A and STRIX boards offer the primary M.2 in the lower right hand of the board away from the hottest section of the board which is the under the PRIMARY X16 PCIe slot. I will note MSI this generation improved by using a top mounted position but it is still not as good as the lower position for thermal isolation ( which also can benefit from intake airflow form your front fans )

ASUS boards support a fan extension card allow for a lot of flexibility at connecting more fans and still having them be controlled by the UEFI / BIOS or within the OS. It is small but for some it a big plus point as it allows for more flexibility in the total number of fans and cable routing.

The STRIX offers a newer USB 3.1 header ( future proof ) for chassis with USB 3.1 headers

If you like RGB the STRIX offers 3 total RGB headers ( 2 standard and 1 addressable ) this allow for more devices to be connected ( LED strips, fans, chassis etc )

The design of the reinforced PCIe slots is very different. MSI used a process which is more of plating on top of the slot but not structurally fully part of the slot. Our design is actually a bonded process so it improves all axis strength against torsion. This is relatively minor though as in reality slot damage rarely occurs unless you are transporting your build a lot.

The IO is made of stainless steel on ASUS is more costly but superior for resistance to oxidation, rust which overtime in a more humid environment can cause shorting and other failures. Almost all other vendors use more basic tin as it is lower cost and generally works fine in many environments

An overlooked area and possibly the most important is the quality of the UEFI / BIOS. While I will try to be balanced here most would agree UEFI releases overtime are important as they help to ensure the best stability, interoperability, compatibility, and performance. ASUS has a much larger development team allowing for more support whether it is internally proactive or based on end-user feedback.

If you look at the releases since launch the STRIX offers 8 official releases, that is double what MSI has released 4. For me, as an enthusiast, this is important as I know the product is being continually improved and supported. Many of these updates are also directly designed to continue to improve key functions, features as well as the overall OC experience.

Last but not least the STRIX offers USB BIOS flashback, this is a great optionf or flashing the UEFI / BIOS evenw ithout the CPU, DRAM, GPU installed you just need to put the file on flash drive and have the PSU cables connected. Additionally any ASUS board also now offers UEFI updating built into the UEFI. You just need your LAN connected and without the need to download a file from another computer you can update directly within the UEFI no OS needed.

For other aspects, the boards are pretty similar

While I feel offer better functionality in some areas it may be very specific so I will note they are fairly parity

Fan Controls

Audio Design ( we do use higher end audio caps though ) with additional filtering and dual OPAMPs on the STRIX compared to the single OP AMP on the MSI. Overall they will seem pretty similar.

One key difference though is we can automatically detect your headphone impedance. This means when you connect the headphone we will automatically set the correct/optimal output power for the headphone to ensure it is properly driven.

LAN design is very similar we both use Intel NICs the best choice out there.

Aesthetics is purely based on personal perspective

Memory support - We official validated much more memory. While motherboards can "communicate" support for a frequency most vendors do not go to the extent to validate as much as we do.

You can easily verify this by comparing the number of modules validated by ASUS compared to others. We lead by a significant margin. This is important as it means we have actually tested boards at those speeds with those modules as opposed to just communicating "support for that frequency"

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/extreme-memory-profile-xmp.html

You can look at the doc for yourself ( which is produced directly by Intel and their XMP validation team )

ASUS - 592 GIGABYTE - 355 MSI - 288 ASROCK - 165

These cover the vast majority of the differences or specifics. Hopefully, this provides insight. I will also note a recent write up I provided to another user regarding OC experience that may be helpful. If you want to check it out below. With that noted best of luck in whatever you pick! if you have other questions let me know.

Overclocking is generally noted limited by the motherboard if it is a quality board.

Speaking directly as a representative from ASUS I can tell you the OC experience between an entry board like the PRIME Z370-A and the much higher end MAXIMUS X HERO is essentially the same.

The key differences come into subtle parameters or tuning as well as temperature.

The VRM design on the PRIME - A is solid and proven to ensure stable and reliable overclocking int he general range of 4.6 to 4.8GHz in some cases even more where the MAXIMUS comes into play is that,

One it offers higher performing VRM components ( inductors, power stages ). These components are the power delivery components for the VRM they operate at higher efficiency and offer higher operating parameters. This helps to ensure more efficiency in power output while being cooler.

Two the heatsink assembly is larger and more robust offering lower operating temperatures for the VRM - As a whole, this is not a critical item but just like some users like buying a bigger 240mm AIO than a 120 or 140AIO some prefer lower temperature under loads.

These things when combined together along with a more advanced topology ( motherboard design ) allows for better peak frequency stability when overclocking. To even reach this you need to be int he higher end frequency range ( 4.8GHz to 5.0GHz+ ) and running heavy loads.

For gaming, this rarely happens as the CPU is generally sitting around 40 to 60% loads ( sometimes more but only on 1 or 2 threads ). As such the total power design is not heavily stressed. If you have more of a mixed workload like editing or rendering or heavy multi-threaded applications it makes sense to consider a board with a higher end heatsink, VRM, and overall topology.

For most situations, though I feel you would best be served with a board like the PRIME Z370-A or STRIX Z370-E

If you want to bump up consider the HERO and if you really want to focus on OC then the APEX. Keep in mind though many users do not take advantage of the more specialized designs and extensive tuning parameters to maximize overclocking of the CPU, BCLK or DRAM.

Keep in mind though as you also move up you get many other areas that are improved upon. Additionally and maybe the most important item look for a board that has a solid track record with UEFI releases. UEFI updates are critical in the long term for ensuring the best OC experience.

Hope this helps and best of luck.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus Prime Z370-A Vs. MSI Z370 GAMING PRO CARBON"

  • 23 months ago
  • 5 points

So this is an interesting comparison as you are not comparing price to price, technically the comparison to the CARBON would be the STRIX Z370-E or F. Although the -A is a very good board and offer a number features that are not offered on the CARBON. With that noted, I do work for ASUS so I am biased but will present only technical differences which are concrete.

The M.2 design is superior on ASUS board. Our heatsink design is a actual true bonded heatsink with thermal pad material as opposed to the plate design used by MSI. Furthermore, we prioritize zones for best thermal performance. This is why both the -A and STRIX boards offer the primary M.2 in the lower right hand of the board away from the hottest section of the board which is the under the PRIMARY X16 PCIe slot. I will note MSI this generation improved by using a top mounted position but it is still not as good as the lower position for thermal isolation ( which also can benefit from intake airflow form your front fans )

ASUS boards support a fan extension card allow for a lot of flexibility at connecting more fans and still having them be controlled by the UEFI / BIOS or within the OS. It is small but for some it a big plus point as it allows for more flexibility in the total number of fans and cable routing.

The STRIX offers a newer USB 3.1 header ( future proof ) for chassis with USB 3.1 headers

If you like RGB the STRIX offers 3 total RGB headers ( 2 standard and 1 addressable ) this allow for more devices to be connected ( LED strips, fans, chassis etc )

The design of the reinforced PCIe slots is very different. MSI used a process which is more of plating on top of the slot but not structurally fully part of the slot. Our design is actually a bonded process so it improves all axis strength against torsion. This is relatively minor though as in reality slot damage rarely occurs unless you are transporting your build a lot.

The IO is made of stainless steel on ASUS is more costly but superior for resistance to oxidation, rust which overtime in a more humid environment can cause shorting and other failures. Almost all other vendors use more basic tin as it is lower cost and generally works fine in many environments

An overlooked area and possibly the most important is the quality of the UEFI / BIOS. While I will try to be balanced here most would agree UEFI releases overtime are important as they help to ensure the best stability, interoperability, compatibility, and performance. ASUS has a much larger development team allowing for more support whether it is internally proactive or based on end-user feedback.

If you look at the releases since launch the STRIX offers 8 official releases, that is double what MSI has released 4. For me, as an enthusiast, this is important as I know the product is being continually improved and supported. Many of these updates are also directly designed to continue to improve key functions, features as well as the overall OC experience.

Last but not least the STRIX offers USB BIOS flashback, this is a great optionf or flashing the UEFI / BIOS evenw ithout the CPU, DRAM, GPU installed you just need to put the file on flash drive and have the PSU cables connected. Additionally any ASUS board also now offers UEFI updating built into the UEFI. You just need your LAN connected and without the need to download a file from another computer you can update directly within the UEFI no OS needed.

For other aspects, the boards are pretty similar

While I feel offer better functionality in some areas it may be very specific so I will note they are fairly parity

Fan Controls

Audio Design ( we do use higher end audio caps though ) with additional filtering and dual OPAMPs on the STRIX compared to the single OP AMP on the MSI. Overall they will seem pretty similar.

One key difference though is we can automatically detect your headphone impedance. This means when you connect the headphone we will automatically set the correct/optimal output power for the headphone to ensure it is properly driven.

LAN design is very similar we both use Intel NICs the best choice out there.

Aesthetics is purely based on personal perspective

Memory support - We official validated much more memory. While motherboards can "communicate" support for a frequency most vendors do not go to the extent to validate as much as we do.

You can easily verify this by comparing the number of modules validated by ASUS compared to others. We lead by a significant margin. This is important as it means we have actually tested boards at those speeds with those modules as opposed to just communicating "support for that frequency"

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/gaming/extreme-memory-profile-xmp.html

You can look at the doc for yourself ( which is produced directly by Intel and their XMP validation team )

ASUS - 592 GIGABYTE - 355 MSI - 288 ASROCK - 165

These cover the vast majority of the differences or specifics. Hopefully, this provides insight. I will also note a recent write up I provided to another user regarding OC experience that may be helpful. If you want to check it out below. With that noted best of luck in whatever you pick! if you have other questions let me know.

Overclocking is generally noted limited by the motherboard if it is a quality board.

Speaking directly as a representative from ASUS I can tell you the OC experience between an entry board like the PRIME Z370-A and the much higher end MAXIMUS X HERO is essentially the same.

The key differences come into subtle parameters or tuning as well as temperature.

The VRM design on the PRIME - A is solid and proven to ensure stable and reliable overclocking int he general range of 4.6 to 4.8GHz in some cases even more where the MAXIMUS comes into play is that,

One it offers higher performing VRM components ( inductors, power stages ). These components are the power delivery components for the VRM they operate at higher efficiency and offer higher operating parameters. This helps to ensure more efficiency in power output while being cooler.

Two the heatsink assembly is larger and more robust offering lower operating temperatures for the VRM - As a whole, this is not a critical item but just like some users like buying a bigger 240mm AIO than a 120 or 140AIO some prefer lower temperature under loads.

These things when combined together along with a more advanced topology ( motherboard design ) allows for better peak frequency stability when overclocking. To even reach this you need to be int he higher end frequency range ( 4.8GHz to 5.0GHz+ ) and running heavy loads.

For gaming, this rarely happens as the CPU is generally sitting around 40 to 60% loads ( sometimes more but only on 1 or 2 threads ). As such the total power design is not heavily stressed. If you have more of a mixed workload like editing or rendering or heavy multi-threaded applications it makes sense to consider a board with a higher end heatsink, VRM, and overall topology.

For most situations, though I feel you would best be served with a board like the PRIME Z370-A or STRIX Z370-E

If you want to bump up consider the HERO and if you really want to focus on OC then the APEX. Keep in mind though many users do not take advantage of the more specialized designs and extensive tuning parameters to maximize overclocking of the CPU, BCLK or DRAM.

Keep in mind though as you also move up you get many other areas that are improved upon. Additionally and maybe the most important item look for a board that has a solid track record with UEFI releases. UEFI updates are critical in the long term for ensuring the best OC experience.

Hope this helps and best of luck.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus B250H - dead USB after power failure"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Most surge protectors used basic MOVs which have a limited lifespan if you have had it for more than a couple of years it is essentially just a big outlet and not protecting anything. As to integrated protection, the boards have built-in ESD diodes for static discharge and there is some integrated surge/spike protection. One a more entry boards it is more basic but actually on ASUS boards more so than others in the industry. That being noted if there was a surge, sag, brownout what could have happened is that it hit the board and was absorbed at the PCH level. This is better than not having the protection and it flowing directly to other devices ( like the storage, DRAM or other critical components where they can be entirely damaged. In the end, without a failure analysis, it is hard to know exactly what happened. Hope some of this provides insight. Also if you did not make sure you have your IO shield installed and get yourself a decent surge protector. For low cost, I recommend either of these two options but if you can afford it getting a unit with true PFC support and true SINE support as well as some type of conditioning or regulation is ideal for high-end systems ( especially if you use sleep or hibernation ). These are a bit more though.

https://www.amazon.com/Furman-SS6B-Plug-Surge-Protector/dp/B0002D017M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1518829237&sr=8-1&keywords=furman+power+strip

https://www.amazon.com/Tripp-Lite-Protector-Right-Angle-ISOBAR6ULTRA/dp/B0000513US/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1518828857&sr=8-2&keywords=isobar

As for windows if you get a new board as the NIC is different this will require re-activation of Windows.

Hope this helps and best of luck with getting back up and running.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus ROG Strix Z370 H Gaming Motherboard"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Overclocking is generally noted limited by the motherboard if it is a quality board.

Speaking directly as a representative from ASUS I can tell you the OC experience between an entry board like the PRIME Z370-A and the much higher end MAXIMUS X HERO is essentially the same.

The key differences come into subtle parameters or tuning as well as temperature.

The VRM design on the PRIME - A is solid and proven to ensure stable and reliable overclocking int he general range of 4.6 to 4.8GHz in some cases even more where the MAXIMUS comes into play is that,

One it offers higher performing VRM components ( inductors, power stages ). These components are the power delivery components for the VRM they operate at higher efficiency and offer higher operating parameters. This helps to ensure more efficiency in power output while being cooler.

Two the heatsink assembly is larger and more robust offering lower operating temperatures for the VRM - As a whole, this is not a critical item but just like some users like buying a bigger 240mm AIO than a 120 or 140AIO some prefer lower temperature under loads.

These things when combined together along with a more advanced topology ( motherboard design ) allows for better peak frequency stability when overclocking. To even reach this you need to be int he higher end frequency range ( 4.8GHz to 5.0GHz+ ) and running heavy loads.

For gaming, this rarely happens as the CPU is generally sitting around 40 to 60% loads ( sometimes more but only on 1 or 2 threads ). As such the total power design is not heavily stressed. If you have more of a mixed workload like editing or rendering or heavy multi-threaded applications it makes sense to consider a board with a higher end heatsink, VRM, and overall topology.

For most situations, though I feel you would best be served with a board like the PRIME Z370-A or STRIX Z370-E

If you want to bump up consider the HERO and if you really want to focus on OC then the APEX. Keep in mind though many users do not take advantage of the more specialized designs and extensive tuning parameters to maximize overclocking of the CPU, BCLK or DRAM.

Keep in mind though as you also move up you get many other areas that are improved upon. Additionally and maybe the most important item look for a board that has a solid track record with UEFI releases. UEFI updates are critical in the long term for ensuring the best OC experience.

Hope this helps and best of luck.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can someone find a Z370 mobo with 8 4pin Fan Headers, 4 sata ports, 2 M.2 slots, and good overclocking"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Consider our Z370-A it supports our fan extension card. It is a 20 dollar accessory that connects to the board and extends the total number of fans that can be connected and controlled by the motherboard. No other board vendor offers this type of functionality especially on a board at the cost of the PRIME - A

In addition, the board supports true PWM output for any CHA fan header. This allows you to use a splitter cable to to connect to multiple fans but have those fans be controlled by a single header. This works well especially for grouped fans like those found in the front intake or top mounted fans.

Hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboards and which one is best"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Overclocking is generally noted limited by the motherboard if it is a quality board.

Speaking directly as a representative from ASUS I can tell you the OC experience between an entry board like the PRIME Z370-A and the much higher end MAXIMUS X HERO is essentially the same.

The key differences come into subtle parameters or tuning as well as temperature.

The VRM design on the PRIME - A is solid and proven to ensure stable and reliable overclocking int he general range of 4.6 to 4.8GHz in some cases even more where the MAXIMUS comes into play is that,

One it offers higher performing VRM components ( inductors, power stages ). These components are the power delivery components for the VRM they operate at higher efficiency and offer higher operating parameters. This helps to ensure more efficiency in power output while being cooler.

Two the heatsink assembly is larger and more robust offering lower operating temperatures for the VRM - As a whole, this is not a critical item but just like some users like buying a bigger 240mm AIO than a 120 or 140AIO some prefer lower temperature under loads.

These things when combined together along with a more advanced topology ( motherboard design ) allows for better peak frequency stability when overclocking. To even reach this you need to be int he higher end frequency range ( 4.8GHz to 5.0GHz+ ) and running heavy loads.

For gaming, this rarely happens as the CPU is generally sitting around 40 to 60% loads ( sometimes more but only on 1 or 2 threads ). As such the total power design is not heavily stressed. If you have more of a mixed workload like editing or rendering or heavy multi-threaded applications it makes sense to consider a board with a higher end heatsink, VRM, and overall topology.

For most situations, though I feel you would best be served with a board like the PRIME Z370-A or STRIX Z370-E

If you want to bump up consider the HERO and if you really want to focus on OC then the APEX. Keep in mind though many users do not take advantage of the more specialized designs and extensive tuning parameters to maximize overclocking of the CPU, BCLK or DRAM.

Keep in mind though as you also move up you get many other areas that are improved upon. Additionally and maybe the most important item look for a board that has a solid track record with UEFI releases. UEFI updates are critical in the long term for ensuring the best OC experience.

Hope this helps and best of luck.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus PRIME B350M-E"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Would appreciate feedback on what it is you do not like? Considering you selected an entry class board and no looking to spend considerably more it is not really a fair comparison when it comes to overall features, functionality, and specifications. That being noted it would be great to have feedback to try and incorporate for boards in this price band for the future.

Considering you have a good CPU designed for overclocking I would have generally recommended STRIX B350-F unless you really want mATX or mini ITX and from there move up to ATX. As others have noted some great choices are the PRIME X370-PRO or STRIX X370-F

Whatever you decide best of the luck with the build and if you have any specific questions let me know!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Itx motherboards?"

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

Actually, cost varies considerably it comes down to the chipset used which then helps to define what level of design effort goes into the board. Speaking from the perspective of a vendor we really set the benchmark with mini ITX boards when we first developed our -I DELUXE series and then moved into the IMPACT series. The design focus on those boards was to not compromise when it can to any aspect of the board but as some have noted this presents a number of design challenges and overall complexity in design, development, and production. Add to that many specialized controls to add more functions and features. While some may think ITX is popular by volume it is a very small percentage of the volume of boards sold so there is also an element of production costs compared to total volume. In the end, though as is the case with many aspects it comes down to the features, functions, specifications and overall quality that drives the cost up. If you are looking for a pretty low-cost ITX you can find one but whether it has everything you want at that price is the question.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus Z370-E GAMING - Kraken X62 and 1080Ti Hybrid"

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

Glad it helped! Best of luck when your build when you start.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Asus Z370-E GAMING - Kraken X62 and 1080Ti Hybrid"

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

First things first, thanks for selecting the STRIX boards, appreciate being part of #TEAMSTRIX

In regards to your question it is a little tricky as there are few ways to do this. Furthermore the instructions for the Kraken are not ideal depending on your perspective on how you want to control and tune your fans. So let's go into this.

The Kraken will come with 2 fans, these two fans ideally connect to the motherboard ( CPU and CPU OPT headers ). This allows them to be fully control by the motherboard inside the UEFI/BIOS or within windows through Fan Xpert.

NZXT includes a splitter fan cable that connects to the Kraken and offers 4 headers. You can connect the 2 included fans to this splitter but then you will have to install the CAM software to control the fans and they will be independent of the fan controls that you will use most likely for your chassis fans ( front intake, or top exhaust / intake or rear exhaust etc ). This splitter requires a SATA power connection from your PSU which also adds more cable clutter in mind opinion. Hence why I recommend connecting the fans to the directly to the motherboard and then connecting the PUMP to the AIO/ water pump header.

The Kraken itself has a property power cable that powers the pump ( not a traditional 4 pin cable that would plug into the water pump / AIO header ). It does have a 3 pin cable that can be connected to the CPU fan header or water pump header and is used for monitoring of the pump.

In addition to all of this you will need to connect a special mini USB cable from the Kraken X62 and then to the motherboard internal USB 2.0 port ( this is to control the lighting effects on the pump / block face ) without it you will not be able to take advantage of the cool RGB lighting the Kraken offers.

In short connect fans to motherboard connect pump cable 3 pin to waterpump / aio header Do not use splitter cable ( unless you want to ) connect mini USB to internal USB 2.0 header on motherboard

For the GPU I think going with a Hybrid is not needed especially with a Maxwell based card. A card like our STRIX 1080 will keep it very cool and quiet and still give you a lot of headroom for OC while also being able to sync lighting effects between the motherboard and other devices. That being noted if you do go with a Hybrid the are easy and no need to worry about other connections as it is all connected directly to the card. All you need to do is just connect the PCIe power cables as you would normally and physically install the card to the PCIe slot.

Best of luck with your upgrade / build!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help Choosing Between Two Ryzen Mobos"

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

No problem. Here to help. At the end of the day I feel accurate information is the best way to go this way leaves little room for bias. Best of luck in whatever you pick.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Full RGB AMD Ryzen 5 Gaming Build ( Red & Black ) - Ryzen 5 1600 , STRIX B350-F & STRIX RX 580

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

In regards to your question anything that has the color red was set to "output" the color red. The software for controlling the RGB lighting for the fans, led strips, graphics card, DRAM everything was done through AURA SYNC. To recap you can set the colors to anything else. Hope this clarifies it for you. Best of luck with your setup.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mirco ATX B350 Motherboard"

  • 23 months ago
  • 2 points

No problem. The one negative about USB based cards if they are bus powered is they rely on the power delivery output of the USB bus which depending on the design implementation can still introduce noise, this is especially the case on more entry boards and when there is a lot of unplugging and re plugging in of devices. If possible look to see if one set of the ports is from an independent controller. This may help. It may be entirely ok either which way. Hope this helps! Best of luck!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming MoBo troubles"

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Was it working previously or is the first time you have powered on the build. Please look to clarify?

If this is the first time ensure you can post outside of the chassis to ensure it is not a short/mounting issue.

Additionally check the QLED diagnostic LED and see where the board is failing to post ( there are 4 LEDs one for CPU, VGA, DRAM and BOOT ). You can reference your manual for location information.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help Choosing Between Two Ryzen Mobos"

  • 23 months ago
  • 3 points

You can check out a recent build I just completed with the STRIX B350-F, while I am biased as I work for ASUS. I can tell you from multiple builds the STRIX is a very solid board in all respects. Furthermore, it has had a lot of continued firmware to improve interoperability, compatibility and overall performance.

In your comparison request, it is a little complicated as ideally, you want to compare B350 to B350 and X370 to X370. The main benefit of going with X370 is generally the integrated designs are higher end in nature ( VRM, audio, number of integrated specifications like ports, Wi-Fi etc. Without knowing more I am not sure you need to consider X370.

Most users looking for X370 are looking for specific features that happen to align with that chispet.

Solid ASUS X370 options include

X370-F STRIX X370-PRO PRIME

If you compared the STRIX B350-F and X370-F

Some of the differences are

Aesthetics the X370 has a IO shroud ( purely visual ) Offers more IO like USB type C, I do not see this as a big plus as you can get USB Type-A to Type C cables and more chassis do not offer native USB C connections internally. Offers more total USB ports Offers more total SATA ports X370 offers superior thermal isolation for M.2 due to lower placement, this is not a critical issue especially as you are probably not getting a ultra high speed M.2 drive where you would need to factor throttle. Furthermore, it is still in a better position that many boards which place it under the primary X16 PCI-e slot

Overall though when it comes to quality like audio implementation VRM, fan controls, Intel NIC etc they are all equal. Equally as important the quality of the UEFI is mature and solid and has a track record of updates.

Hope this helps and best of luck in whatever you pick!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mirco ATX B350 Motherboard"

  • 23 months ago
  • 3 points

Based on the issues you noted it may be your board was having ESD / EMI issues. This can present itself due to a number of factors including line-level power quality, other components and sometimes firmware. On occasion, the boards also may not be properly seated.

Either which way if you are looking for an alternate solution you may want to check out the https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/TUF-B350M-PLUS-GAMING/

Some specifics plus points it offers for improved reliability are its extensive ESD diode protection throughout all the IO. This is important as when countered this helps to reduce signal issues which can cause instability, shorts and other issues.

Beyond that spec wise you should have no issues with reaching the OC target you want the VRM and UEFI are solid additionally the board easily support D.O.C.P memory profiling which lets you attempt to load XMP values ( for frequency, voltage and timings ) from your kit of memory to the UEFI. Although the success does vary based on the IC and the quality of the XMP profile.

Audio-wise if you are willing to spend a little you can get a big upgrade by going to something like a Xonar DGX. It is pretty low cost but a huge upgrade even when compared to the premium audio designs on much higher end motherboards.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Full RGB AMD Ryzen 5 Gaming Build ( Red & Black ) - Ryzen 5 1600 , STRIX B350-F & STRIX RX 580

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

WOW, that is some pretty big props. Appreciate the kudos and the support and consideration of ASUS and ROG & STRIX series products. As I have always communicated often imitated but never duplicated.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Full RGB AMD Ryzen 5 Gaming Build ( Red & Black ) - Ryzen 5 1600 , STRIX B350-F & STRIX RX 580

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, appreciate the kudos. Overall happy with how it turned out. I think the main item I might add would be 1 additional SATA SSD for the PSU mount or possibly the read panel. Otherwise the overall look, feel and functionality turned out pretty close to what I intended to have when I started the build.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Full RGB AMD Ryzen 5 Gaming Build ( Red & Black ) - Ryzen 5 1600 , STRIX B350-F & STRIX RX 580

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

As noted in this profile. I work for ASUS. I build these systems a reference for the community. I get people looking for examples of builds with certain boards, or design elements or to show off certain functions. An example of this a lot of people have asked for AMD based build ( on B350, not X370 ) as well as showing AURA controllable fans.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: White Themed Z370 Gaming Build - ASUS Z370-A, Intel Coffe Lake 8600K & STRIX GTX 1080

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Will update. I will also double check on the memory / DRAM.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Full RGB AMD Ryzen 5 Gaming Build ( Red & Black ) - Ryzen 5 1600 , STRIX B350-F & STRIX RX 580

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, I actually used both the DELTA R and the NightHawk. Both are awesome, quality of construction is outstanding, IC design is very good, XMP profiles work reliably. You could not ask for more. I noted it in my write up and I will note it again the build quality and lighting design on the NightHawk is AWESOME!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASRock Fatal1ty Z370 Gaming-ITX/ac Or ASUS ROG STRIX Z370-I"

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

What are you looking for specifically? asusisthebest17777 does a good job of calling out a number of items. One item you should ask yourself is if you plan to OC. If not you can consider the B250I-Gaming. Both are great board with similar features, functions and specifications but the Z370-I is best suited to someone who is interested in overclocking their CPU.

I will also note the STRIX offers USB 3.1 connectivity which is nice if you are considering a chassis which supports it, furthermore the heatsink is a split design for better efficiency and performance. The heatpipe used on the across is a good solution but also closer to the GPU and ambient heat pooling which is not a factor on the STRIX.

Last but not least the audio solution is improved moderately on the STRIX compared to the fatal1ty ( shielding, dual OP-AMP )

Hope this helps! Best of luck with the build with whatever you chose.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Your Motherboards for Ryzen"

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

UEFI / BIOS is a critical part of ensuring stability, reliability, DRAM support and overall experience. Many reviews were completed early on with early builds and not representative of the current refinements/improvements present. I would consider a board like the PRIME X370-PRO it is feature rich, solid design and has had extensive UEFI releases ( currently 15 ). Along with the choice, your decision on DRAM is an important one and would recommend a kit on the QVL list.

Best of luck in whatever you decide.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Z170i Pro Gaming is allowing BCLK oveclocking on i7 6700??"

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Update to the latest UEFI release. Minor BCLK adjustment is supported The board has an external clock generator that allows for some flexibility but the overall range is very limited. Furthermore, in your situation with a non K CPU there is no value to this. You will introduce more issues than anything else and would be better off setting the board to UEFI defaults and enabling XMP if you have XMP profiled memory ( DRAM ). Hope this helps. Best of luck with the build.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: White Themed Z170 TUF Build - SABERTOOTH Z170S & 6600K & DUAL GTX 1070

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Appreciate the kudos, enjoy the rest of your day.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard RGB problems"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Please ensure you are running the latest UEFi and the latest version of ASUS AURA. With both of these present, you should be able to make all adjustments. You may need to clear the CMOS if there is an eprom issue with pre-existing information.

The current version is noted below.

Aura V1.05.28

Please also ensure you do not have conflicting applications. I would also recommend you manually stop all ASUS services prior to installing the latest version. Once you have stopped all services you can proceed to uninstall AURA and then reboot and install the version noted above.

Thanks for being part of #TEAMSTRIX! Best of luck with your build!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "z370 Motherboard with CPU fan control that allows 0 RPM"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Once fans are calibrated ( you need to ensure you run the calibration whether it be in the UEFI or OS ) on ASUS you have extremely low RPM values but not zero to ensure safety. If this is not satisfactory then I would just consider disabling the fan control option on the header.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Z370 MicroATX Mobo options, need help."

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

I would keep in mind coil whine is dependent on multiple factors. In the personal boards I have tested ( 3 of the mATX board ) i have found zero issues with "coil whine" which is pretty rare on a motherboard. I had no issues with general overclocking for both the CPU and DRAM ( both automatically as well as manually.

In regards to LLC it is generally not very well understood and even more so generally incorrectly measured as the only correct way to do so is with direct probing via contacts under the CPU socket. In mine general testing, I had no issues defining the voltage parameters I need for general overclocking pursuits. I used an adaptive voltage as opposed to a manual voltage which some prefer but then again I prefer to leverage newer OC technologies that allow for greater efficiency and less voltage degradation.

If looking for solid altenrative for ATX consider the Z370-A PRIME or STRIX Z370-E or -F if you really care about VRM performance then the HERO.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "XMP IS PROBLEMATIC? MOTHERBOARD AND RAMS QUESTION"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Make sure to update the UEFI for optimal compatibility.

As for setting the DRAM frequency ideally, you want to use XMP as that setting will apply the frequency, timing and voltage for the memory defined by the memory manufacturer. If you do not want to use XMP you can manually set the memory divider manually ( just selecting the memory frequency ). From there the board will attempt to automatically define the other values. This will generally work but it may not be optimal for the DIMMs you have.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Z370 Strix-H Gaming or Prime-A"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

The PRIME A offers a higher performing VRM. This really only comes into play if you have a great CPU and will be holding high frequencies for a sustained period overtime. In this respect, the stability may be slightly improved but for the vast majority of users, the experience for overclocking will be the same between the two boards. This is the case for both DRAM and CPU. GPU is not influenced by the board.

As noted by Chillsabre the STRIX does have some nice additional software packages which are gamer focused ( audio suite and networking software ) but overall I actually prefer the -A due to additional design benefits on the board. In most situations, the day in and day out experience will seem very similar if not identical.

Key items i like on the -A more

White looks great M.2 heatsink Fan Extension card header support RGB backlight with RGB header for expansion to chassis, LED strips, fans etc More robust VRM with better heatsink design

Hope this helps! Best of luck with the build and thanks for considering #ASUS

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is the Strix B-350 compatible with Corsair 3200 ram?"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Keep in mind that for AMD motherboards when using XMP based memory modules you want to ensure you update to the latest UEFI. Additionally, you will want to use the DOCP profile option in the UEFI to attempt to auto apply the corresponding frequency, timings, and voltage for the memory module. As others have noted 3200 while possible can sometimes pose issues especially with some ICs ( the chips used on the memory ).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "B350-F Rog Strix"

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Great board, just finished a recent build in it. Please ensure you update the UEFI to the latest build. Furthermore, once you have the latest UEFI ensure you download the latest version of the ASUS AURA SYNC software. You can find it on the support site. Support.Asus.Com

Thanks for being #TEAMSTRIX - Best of luck with the build!

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