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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Node Connector"

  • 4 months ago
  • 3 points

it is a header designed for monitoring and control - It was developed to allow us ( ASUS ) to have advanced interoperability with branded ASUS components as well as partners having access for respective products.

Examples include a chassis that has built-in fan monitoring, system values like frequency and voltages, etc.

Another would be a power supply which can provide low-level monitoring values on PSU operation alongside control of PSU.

The NODE header launched with Z390 motherboards and will be found on boards across both AMD and Intel chipsets moving forward. Due to it's intended usage it will only be found on higher end boards.

There are a couple of partners that have offerings for it now like InWin for example but more will be annoucned soon.

In addition the NODE header replaces our previous generation Fan Ext header and supports our new Fan Ext Card II card which offers the same functionality and core feature of offering additional fan headers and temperature input sources but also adds additional RGB lighting headers. These operate on a low level and are seen as transparent essentially as native onboard headers and can be controlled in the UEFI or within the OS via AiSuite.

Hope this helps and clarifies things.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Maximus Xi Code or Gigabyte Z390 Master"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

A true DOA is very rare. With this noted with a ROG board, they do qualify for our Advanced RMA ( APS warranty ). This means that you can submit an RMA directly with ASUS as long as you have a valid Proof Of Purchase and do not want to go through the etailer ( which is generally the default option ). Processing an Advanced RMA requires we put a CC on file and once this is complete a replacement board is sent out to your before the "DOA" board is shipped back to ASUS by you. If it is not received of course your card is charged.

Beyond that, you can see in the community the stability and reliability and quality of the UEFI/BIOS has been very solid. This is also a key aspect to the overall experience you will have with a board.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "X570 or X470"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem! Best of luck with the build!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "M.2 NVMe disks disappeared after CPU/BIOS update"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

That is very odd that both would "fail". In regards to NVMe support, they are both fully supported. You may want to consider parted magic and seeing if you can run a secure erase if the drives are detected. From there also double check on the vendor's sites for any firmware releases. Alternatively, you can get yourself a low-cost M.2 USB 3 enclosure and turn them into high sped external SSDs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "X570 or X470"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

While I cannot go into specifics the until post embargo I can note that the VRM assembly has been specifically redesigned on X570 boards for 3rd Gen Ryzen CPUs. There is also considerations in regards to board level PCB tuning and UEFI optimization. This is also true for previous gen platforms that get patched in support vs native support.

Native support carries the benefit that the code base and all default tuning prioritizes the latest CPU as opposed to legacy components. When evaluating general stock experience it will generally be a parity experience but when considering overclocking there will be a greater difference due to inherent optimizations.

With this noted if you do have interest in PCIe Gen 4 be aware this is not an option on the X470 Crosshair. The only areas that would generally be a clear upgrade on the Crosshair would be

Audio is higher end ( with a ESS SABRE DAC ) Specialized connections for watercooling like water temp and flow monitoring headers.

The -E will have PCIe Gen 4 support New 2ng generation RGB addressable header ( 1 ) others are standard 8 SATA ports vs 6 ports Dual LAN with 2.5G LAN & Intel Gigabit vs Single Intel Gigabit WiFi is AX as opposed to AC based ( backward compatible to AC )

With all this noted the CROSSHAIR is an outstanding board and will continue to receive great UEFI support which is why the board has offered a great AMD Ryzen experience.

Hope this helps and thanks for being #TEAMROG

Comment reply on Forum Topic "X570"

  • 5 months ago
  • 3 points

Prices will be released / official once the embargo is not longer in place. Essentially once the official launch occurs. Outside of this information is limited to high-level specifications or features.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "M.2 NVMe disks disappeared after CPU/BIOS update"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, I saw I understand they worked by default. Generally, the CSM policy will automatically prioritize strings for compatible devices initially but after the boot loader is created and depending on firmware strings for the drives and updates applied to the AEGSA and storage ROM changes can occur.

I would recommend you verify that you do in fact have CSM manually set to disabled. Additionally, check in the boot order if you have windows boot manager but not an actual volume.

To circle back when doing UEFI updates that contain AGESA updates especially if there are multiple jumps it is also best to create an image back up as the initialization policies can changes for storage. This is also why specific drivers were recommended for the chipset prior to the latest AGESA update being applied.

If you are not successful in disabling CSM you may want to consider a repair to the boot loader via booting into an installer and then run the repair option on the disk volume. If the volumes are being mapped but the boot loaders are not linking correctly this will resolve that issue.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "M.2 NVMe disks disappeared after CPU/BIOS update"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

they will not register as drives as the recognition is for SATA based ports, not M.2 slots - You can disable the CSM option which is ideal for the M.2.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How to decide on a motherboard?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

It is not clear as to what you intended usage is but if it is a general gaming PC then the 9700K is a great choice. It offers high clocks speeds is much easier to cool than the 9900K and overclocks well.

With this is mind I can tell you any Z390 board will be able to handle the 9700K at stock and overclocked from ASUS line up.

This means the Z390-A to the STRIX Z390-E or MAXIMUS XI HERO. The choice comes down to the feature set you prefer on the boards.

While there will be differences in the VRM Design some components being higher end with greater efficiency it will not considerably affect your experience even when overclocked. All of the VRM will be able to cover the increased wattage.

Think of it like buying a power supply you only need 450 WATTs but you are buying a board with at least 600 and then each one goes up to lets say 1000. All of then handle that 450 WATT. Some may offer more options for tuning or may be more efficient meaning they will run a little cooler but overall none will limit your stability, reliability or OC experience. I can tell you that from real world hands on experience with all the boards I have noted.

What you will note more will be items like the aesthetics of the board how many RGB headers does it have for lighting How many USB ports Does it have WiFi What type of sound design does it have What type of fan headers and cooling control does it offer etc.

My recommendation would be the STRIX Z390-E Gaming if you want to go for a solid choice. To help provide some contrast as to how a board may differ please see some feedback I have provided to another user with a similar question -

The main benefits of moving over to a higher end board like the HERO as opposed to the STRIX would be

Audio - The HERO features the same audio suite codec 1220 ( supreme FX ) but also includes an ESS SABRE DAC. This provides improvements to music, movies/video & games it is clearer, sharper and provides better tonality. The AMP also extends/enhances volume range. That being noted the audio on the -E is already good. This is for those that just want better.

More RGB connectivity - 4 headers for more connections to RGB accessories the STRIX has 2. Additionally, it has more onboard lighting zones.

Advanced watercooling support - The HERO has specialized headers for custom water cooling for temperature and flow monitoring

Larger heatsinks - The HERO has much larger heatsinks with a heat pipe. The STRIX-E has solid 2 stage heatsink design and also includes a VRM fan for active cooling. You do not need the HERO to acheive 5GHz. The benefit is lower operating temps. Think of like a Noctua 12US vs a 14US. The are both great but the 14US will offer lower temps at the same clocks.

The VRM is upgraded compared to the STRIX-E but again both are great and will offer you more than enough for overclocking ( both the CPU and RAM side ).

Richer software suite - The core gaming software and RGB software and overclocking software is all the same AURA, AiSuite ( including OC and Fan Controls ), Game First packet priority software, Audio software ( SupremeFX ), RamCache ( lets you apply memory to your storage to improve read performance )

The HERO offers all of this along with RamDisk - let's you create a drive from your memory. This is maintained between reboots and is great for installing your web browser or small applications. you can also junction it to game folders. Also included is a full 1 year license of Kaspersky AV

Last but not least they both offer support for

NODE header - A special expansion header for some chassis and accessories on the market allowing for monitoring and control Fan Extension Card - A special header than lets you add a card to easily enhance and extend the number of headers for number of fans to be powered and controled by the motherboard ( adds an additioanl 3 fan headers )

There are a few other specific items that have some value but hopefully, this helps add some clarity in the differences and the feature set and what you can feel confident you get out of the OC experience between these boards.

With this noted as you see the HERO can offer more but everything that almost all builders would want exists on the STRIX Z390-E.

For some notes on other items

The cooler you picked is great but I would consider the Noctua U14S it is more compact and is great in regards to cooling and build quality and will let you see more of the board in your system

For the same price on RAM you can get RGB enabled memory if it is important to you

The chassis also maybe consider checking on P series from Phanteks. I think you will get a little more for around the same and have RGB lighting integration and little better intake airflow although this is not critical.

Hope this helps, if you have other questions let me know.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "SR3-DARK or DOMINUS EXTREME"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

The SR3 DARK is not available at this time only the DOMINUS EXTREME - I would also note the DOMINUS is already in used at leading system integrators. This is a key advantage as it is currently being used and proven in the high-end system builds and allows us to further tune and improve the UEFI which is a key part of the overall usability, compatibility, stability and OC experience for boards like these. Specifications are a based line for easy comparison but the UEFI is an area ROG board excel at consistently offering a superior experience that is critical for a high end board.

To my knowledge the specs are not fornally availible either for the DARK but some areas I expect the DOMINUS will offer more are 1. Better audio with an ESS SABRE DAC onboard 2. More RGB lighting zones onboard with more RGB connecitivity 3. Easier fan connections with grouped headers ideal for watercooling and minimal cable routing 4. VRM is actively cooled with massive heatsink and active fans - No watercooling needed ( although partners do product a VRM waterblock ) - Additionally has special WB sensor header for leak, flow, temp monitoring and more 5. Fully integrated IO shroud 6. More extensive memory validation with more memory support ( physically and via compatibility ) 7. The premium design of and use of materials - The entire VRM heatsink, front-facing shroud and motherboard backplate are all aluminum. It makes for a very heavy board.

It is hard to comment outside of some of these other elements as the full specs are not available for the SR3. There are also different software package where the DOMINUS will come with 1-year license of Kaspersky AV RamCache and RamDisk software GameFirst packet priority software Sonic Studio audio suite Fan Xpert fan controls AiSuite for system monitoring and overclocking ASUS AURA for extensive RGB lighting ecosystem support ( Fans, Graphics Card, Peripherals, DRAM, SSD, Chassis, LED strips etc )

hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "B450 / X470 BIOS Update for Zen 2 Ryzen 3000 Catch-22?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 2 points

If the motherboard supports it the scenarios are noted below

I speak on the behalf of ASUS based motherboards 1. the motherboard has USB BIOS FLASHBACK ( a feature that allows the motherboards UEFI to be updated without a CPU, Memory or Graphics Card installed ). You only need PSU power, USB flash drive. You download the file, rename it and place it on the flash drive and then connect it to a dedicated port for flashing purposes and complete the update 2. Motherboards UEFI are continually updated during production. Depending on the board you purchase and the time it is produced it may already have a compatible / based supported version of the UEFI to allow you to post / power on and then complete an update to latest UEFI release 3. You have an old UEFI that does not allow the board to post. It also does not have USB BIOS FLASHBACK. You can send it in for service to have it updated or if you have access to an older supported CPU would need to use it complete the update to the latest UEFI release 4.If the motherboard features a swappable/replaceable ROM chip for the UEFI you can contact service and if you can get a update ROM chip flashed with the latest UEFI. You would need to remove the ROM chip and then installed the new ROM ( updated ) ROM chip in it's place.

Hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard needed, RGB essential!"

  • 5 months ago
  • 2 points

To clarify the PCH RGB lighting will still be visible but less so once a graphics card is installed. This is true for all motherboards that have lighting in the PCH area ( the bottom right-hand corner by the SATA ports ). The other lighting is still visible which is on the shroud for the IO section. You also have a RGB header on the motherboard to connect a LED strip or RGB splitter where you can connect more than one RGB device like fans or multiple LED strips.

Going to a higher end motherboard will give you more zones of onboard lighting as well as more RGB heades. You may first want to decide what are the most important aspects for you when it comes to this build for deciding on the board. The selection of the X470 PRO is very solid though and will offer a stable and relaible experience at stock and overclocked settings while also offering entry RGB lighting options.

As you purpose is focused on music production both B450 and X470 are solid choice and you may even want to consider B450 as you need the higher chipset specification support.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any mobo's with built-in thermometer?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

No problem!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard with support for 256GB of RAM"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

We have validated X99 for 256GB and are working on it for newer platforms but this is going to be limited generally too specialized DIMMS so you want to ensure QVL prior. Additionally, most of these larger DIMMs tend to be registered / ECC so it may require XEON support.

Overall my recommendation is looking at our WS series of motherboards this is extensively validated for high density and offer extensive multi PCIe slot support.

One other item is keep in mind higher frequencies are heavily dependent on IMC ( memory controller ) and even if the board supports that density it may not be able to operate at the frequency and density on the board.

an example is

while you can buy XMP 4266 memory not all CPUs or boards can operate at this speed even if the memory is fully stable at those speeds and has been validated. The more channels the more diffucult to run at high density and high frequency. I will also not thermals are an important factor if the memory is under sustained load.

I generally would advise active airflow if the memory will continually be utilized and is under load and is operating above 3600MHz ( especially in 128 or greater configurations ). Hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What motherboard for a mATX build?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

The prime varies in regards to its availability. You can get the ASUS TUF Z390M-Pro Gaming (Wi-Fi) currently online and it is a solid choice for a 9600K even if overclocked.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any mobo's with built-in thermometer?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

All motherboards have a super IO controller which allow for a base temperature of the motherboard to be reported. This is not always accurate though as the temperature may be more indicative of the location of the sensor / superior controller. It can also be influenced by graphics cards if they are above this location.

If you want more accurate results our range of motherboards ( ROG ) have OPT temp sensor headers which you can connect a thermistor to and place that wherever you want to have accurate temperature wherever you want.

In addition, many of our motherboards have a FAN EXT header. This header lets you connect a card where you can connect up to 3 temp sensors. You can have this just for reference or even have specific fan headers respond to specific thermistors.

Hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS PRIME Z390-A LLC 2 ( AUTO )"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard has what is refered to as auto rules. They are calibrated to align witht he voltage and multiplier you define.

In 80 to 90% of situations there is no need to modify the LLC value. In fact some users who manually set the LCC can have a worse experience. As such I recommend not adjsuting it.

Keep in mind that vdroop is also not negative. You can learn to overclock with droop as opposed to compensating by adding more voltage to not have droop. This all depends on how you want to define your overclock.

Most users who only want to use a manual / static vid ( which is not efficient ) and runs a higher risk of voltage degrdation want to have a aggressive 1 to 1 value alignign their defined voltage with a vdroop that ensures no drop in voltage. keep in mind this will varying dependin on load ( meaning you may need different levels for different loads )

Gaming would be different than prime95 which would be different than video encoding.

Personally I would recommend leaving it on auto and using an adaptive vid. Better yet our auto overclocking will do this all automatically for you but as always the choice is up to you. Hope this helps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Wireless Networking"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Many of our newer mid range ASUS board will come with WiFi onboard and actually offer very good range and performance.

These will generally be 2x2 802.11ac. - Keep in mind to ideally get the best performance you want a router that offers at least 2x2 antenna the more the better especially if you are at longer distances. Some of the newest motherboards come with wireless adapters built in that support MU-MIMO as well as BeamForming and 160MHz operation all which allow for better WiFi experience but are dependent on the router supporting those functions so keep that in mind.

If you want to pick up a board that does not have WiFi you can easily add it with a great USB adapter like - USB-AC53 Nano

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need help picking out the right motherboard for me."

  • 5 months ago
  • 2 points

This is a great board and will offer a stable and realible platform to build on. It also is a solid overclocker.

I can tell you that moving up is really only for those looking for specific benefits that align with their build. For most entry users my recommendation would be the Z390-A or the STRIX Z390-E

I recently answered another user providing some insight into how the -E compares to a higher end board ( just for reference ).

The main benefits of moving over to a higher end board like the HERO as opposed to the STRIX would be

Audio - The HERO features the same audio suite codec 1220 ( supreme FX ) but also includes an ESS SABRE DAC. This provides improvements to music, movies/video & games it is clearer, sharper and provides better tonality. The AMP also extends/enhances volume range. That being noted the audio on the -E is already good. This is for those that just want better.

More RGB connectivity - 4 headers for more connections to RGB accessories the STRIX has 2. Additionally, it has more onboard lighting zones.

Advanced watercooling support - The HERO has specialized headers for custom water cooling for temperature and flow monitoring

Larger heatsinks - The HERO has much larger heatsinks with a heat pipe. The STRIX-E has solid 2 stage heatsink design and also includes a VRM fan for active cooling. You do not need the HERO to acheive 5GHz. The benefit is lower operating temps. Think of like a Noctua 12US vs a 14US. The are both great but the 14US will offer lower temps at the same clocks.

The VRM is upgraded compared to the STRIX-E but again both are great and will offer you more than enough for overclocking ( both the CPU and RAM side ).

Richer software suite - The core gaming software and RGB software and overclocking software is all the same AURA, AiSuite ( including OC and Fan Controls ), Game First packet priority software, Audio software ( SupremeFX ), RamCache ( lets you apply memory to your storage to improve read performance )

The HERO offers all of this along with RamDisk - let's you create a drive from your memory. This is maintained between reboots and is great for installing your web browser or small applications. you can also junction it to game folders. Also included is a full 1 year license of Kaspersky AV

Last but not least they both offer support for

NODE header - A special expansion header for some chassis and accessories on the market allowing for monitoring and control Fan Extension Card - A special header than lets you add a card to easily enhance and extend the number of headers for number of fans to be powered and controled by the motherboard ( adds an additioanl 3 fan headers )

There are a few other specific items that have some value but hopefully, this helps add some clarity in the differences and the feature set and what you can feel confident you get out of the OC experience between these boards.

With this noted as you see the HERO can offer more but everything that almost all builders would want exists on the STRIX Z390-E. Going down you begin to remove some items that would be more commonly appreciated in mid range builds.

Hope this helps, if you have other questions let me know.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "B450/X470 Zen 2 BIOS Updates?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

I can confirm ASUS has also released applicable UEFI released for applicable models.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How do you choose a good motherboard for your build?"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

an often overlooked area is the quality of the UEFI. Think about it like a smartphone the hardware defines a lot of the experience but the OS and firmware applied by the manufacturer heavily influences the stability, reliability, usability and overall experience.

A great board requires both hardware design ( VRM, layout, trace design, core specifications ) along with good quality and well-supproted UEFI to ensure a great experience especially if overclocking.

This also plays into compatibility with a large number of devices.

An example is one board may be a very good overclocker but with a limited number of DIMMs ( memory module ) while another may have a smoother and better experience with a wider range of modules. As a DIY user, this is important as it is difficult to know what you may pick.

This goes along with many of the other points noted by others.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS ROG Strix Z390-E VS. Aorus Gigabyte Ultra"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

I am biased but the -E is a very solid board. The quality of the UEFI BIOS is extremely important when considering a board as it in coordination with the hardware design is what dictates the overall experience when it comes to overclocking, interoperability and usability.

I would also note the Ultra is more in line to be compared to the MAXIMUS XI HERO.

With this noted the 9700K has minimal current draw due to being a 8 thread CPU. In this respect the OC experience between a board like our STRIX Z390-E and PRIME Z390-A will be essentially partiy - You will be able to maximize the OC potential whatever that might be. Keep in mind that every CPU is different but for most 9700K you can expect between 4.7 to 5.1GHz all cores.

One benefit of these boards is our auto tuning technology and rich OC options. When installing the CPU it will automatically provide you values for voltage, multipliers, cache ratios and cache voltages making the overclocking process very simple and clear. This is if you pursue it manually.

If you go the route of automatic you can execute this via Aisuite III in the OS via our Ai Overclocking - The reuslts will be specific to your CPU and cooler and will be saved directly to the UEFI BIOS. Even if you uninstall the software the Overclock is maintain as it is adjusts the clocks speeds in real-time while stress testing the CPU to ensure stability.

The main benefits of moving over to a higher end board like the HERO as opposed to the STRIX would be

Audio - The HERO features the same audo suite and based codec 1220 ( supreme FX ) but also includes an ESS SABRE DAC More RGB connectivity - 4 headers for more connections to RGB accessories the STRIX has 2 Advanced watercooling support - The HERO has specialized headers for custom water cooling for temperature and flow monitoring Larger heatsinks - The HERO has much larger heatsinks with a heatpipe. The STRIX-E has solid heatsink design and an included fan and you do not need the HERO to acheice 5GHz. The benefit is lower operating temps. Think of like a Noctua 12US vs a 14US. The are both great but the 14US will offer lower temps at the same clocks. Richer software suite - The core gaming software and RGB software and overclocking software is all the same AURA, AiSuite ( including OC and Fan Controls ), Game First packet priority software, Audio software ( SupremeFX ), RamCache ( lets you apply memory to your storage to improve read performance )

The HERO offers all of this along with RamDisk - let's you create a drive from your memory Included full 1 year license of Kaspersky AV

Last but not least they both offer support for

NODE header - A special expansion header for some chassis and accessories on the market allowing for monitoring and control Fan Extension Card - A special header than lets you add a card to easily enhance and extend the number of headers for number of fans to be powered and controled by the motherboard ( adds an additioanl 3 fan headers )

There are a few other specific items that have some value but hopefully this helps add some clarity in the differences and the feature set and what you can feel confident you get out of the OC experience between these boards.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard to GPU compatibility"

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Ensure you also have an update to UEFI / BIOS many graphics cards were shifting from legacy VIOS to newer native UEFI vbios support. Some boards do not work correctly if the BIOS is out of date. As noted by some others. Be sensible about your upgrade as you want to compliment the GPU to align with the performance your CPU allows for.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, I work for ASUS. Been with the company for 10 years+. You may have seen me online in various videos or streams I have done. Name is JJ. It is a tough industry and definitely challenging but rewarding position. It is a great job though. I really appreciate the design, innovation and depth of products we offer.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! I am biased of course but wanted to give some love to our new TUF GAMING line as normally I focus on RO, STRIX, and PRIME.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Maybe in another build. The goal was just to show off what a build could look like in this chassis. It is really well suited for higher end builds including water cooling. This is why I showed the radiator and the pump/res installed so people could get a sense of its fit when it comes to this.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah always hard in that regard. I preferred to go with he 1660Ti as it is strong and no worries about RTX which has varying performance but agree having it is great and it will only improve in time. Also, the 1660Ti with time will scale downwards so you will see more difference between the two cards. The other main reason was trying to tying in a GPU that offers full native G-SYNC compatible support.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes, I think the sweet spot would be 1 drive with one M.2 ( although for budget a more entry budget of course a single 1TB is fine for 60 to 70% of users ). The pricing though for these is very reasonable the 1TB is less than 125 so you could get two 250 or 500 pretty lost cost and as you can see they definitely add pop tot he system. They look even cooler in mix color modes or in addressble mode ( you can get both 5V and 12V versions ). The one limitation is this system is running them off a single controller/header via a splitter so they are synced. I think it would be cool to have contrasting colors mixed in.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the kudos. Have an awesome Monday and even better week.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: B450, Ryzen 5, 2600X, GTX 1660Ti - ASUS TUF Gaming RGB Build

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the love. As always it is appreciated.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mobo rgb issue"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

There are alot of options

2 options that are really easy is using a fan you already have and just getting RGB LED fan frames. They have them from Phanteks ( Halos ) as wella s Silverstone and AKASA. They all connect to a header. You will need to get a cheap RGB splitter though to run to one of the headers and then runs the cables to the back. They will all sync to the same color though as they are on a splitter.

I personally really like the fan frames with white fans as they pop with the RGB color and look great as white reflects as opposed to black which asorbs

A couple of other fans include Fractal Designs, AKASA, ID Cooling all are native 4 pin AURA compatible fans. Some of the triple packs like that from ID Cooling will also come with a splitter already. There are other options also on Amazon that are from ASIAN companies. Keep in mind though you want to ensure it notes 4pin 5050 RGB connection to a motherboard to ensure they are control and sync compatible.

If you check out this website it will detail all the current native compatible options https://www.asus.com/campaign/aura/us/Partners-and-promotions.html

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mobo rgb issue"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard has two standard 5050 RGB headers. It does not have addressable headers. As such it is not compatible with these type of fans. You would need standard RGB 4 pin fans not addressable fans to connect directly to the motherboard.

Hope this helps and best of luck with your build! Thanks for being #TEAMSTRIX

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Urgent: Does Asus RMA Cover Bent Socket Pins"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

No, it does not cover direct or indirect physical damage to the socket and its pins. You can RMA the board but it will be processed as an out of warranty repair and you would communicate a charge which is based on the MSRP of the motherboard. This is generally around $75 to $150 dollars so it generally only makes sense on very expensive boards.

In most situations, if it is a pin or two you can probably use a magnifying lens and precision tweezers and make it work.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I cant get back into bios"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Make sure you update the UEFI to the latest version. You also can adjust the splash screen interval period. If you want to reset the CMOS consider a small tipped screwdriver and use it to bridge the CMOS jumper on the motherboard. This resets the CMOS which should not generally lock up unless the values are too aggressive or not stable ( which is definitely possible when attempting memory overclocking ). Ensure you are scaling up voltage when attempting DRAM overclocking or consider using profiles within the UEFI to apply a preset target for the value you are trying to reach. As noted though if you made a jump from 2666 to 3000 that is a pretty solid increase.

If you do not want to use a screwdriver you can buy a jumper for a couple of dollars including shipping and just "place" this ontop the pins to short / clear the CMOS.

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Harwin/M50-1900005?qs=hQdOagyNhkvFZChZOhb1qQ%3D%3D&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIg6jV0-O24QIVpx-tBh1chwR3EAQYAiABEgIrdvD_BwE

I would recommend you create a UEFI profile before clearing your CMOS so you do not have to continually keep entering in your modified values.

Thanks for being #TEAMPRIME

Comment reply on Forum Topic "MOTHERBOARD SUPPORT"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

I cannot officially comment on unreleased products but it is important to keep in mind that UEFI updates contain CPU microcode that is specific to CPU ranges. While updates can introduce support for newer CPUs assuming all physical requirements are present on the board there is a challenge on whether or not the microcode update requires removal of previous microcode. Additionally, sometimes more entry boards with smaller UEFI rom sizes cannot support as much updating. All things considered, I would generally wait until a formal announcement is completed to ensure the board you are considering is going to have the corresponding update.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherbourd choice"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends on if you want to use a splitter for both or want dedicated headers for each item. I would recommend the ASUS ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING it is about 10 dollars more but does cover you in regards to very good memory interoperability/compatibility and has two independent headers.

If you go to the AURA website you can find all the fans on the market that are available that support working directly with the RGB header as opposed to needing a separate controller. With this noted there are many Chinese options on AMAZON that are not listed that would work but you need to confirm they have standard RGB 5050 header support.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Tight screws in M.2 heatsink on ASUS ROG STRIX Z390-I GAMING Motherboard"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

You may not have the correct size for the precision screwdriver. The best option if you want to minimize stripping is to use a wrench of some type of pliers to hold the base standoff and then unscrew the mounting screw. With that noted the motherboard comes included with the M.2 mounting screw in a clear bag. This is what you should be using to mount the drive. Otherwise, the standoffs should not be removed as there are already pre-mounted.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Z390 i7 9700K & RTX 2080Ti RGB Gaming System - ROG MAXIMUS XI CODE & STRIX RTX 2080Ti - Phanteks Enthoo Evolv

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

recognition / a way of expressing cool or good job / thanks!

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Z390 i7 9700K & RTX 2080Ti RGB Gaming System - ROG MAXIMUS XI CODE & STRIX RTX 2080Ti - Phanteks Enthoo Evolv

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

yes, the memory controller on Ryzen and X series chipset is considerably improved from previous generations but is generally limited to 3000 to 3200. Especially if going higher density it can become more challenging. Regardless kudos on your build and best of luck!

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Z390 i7 9700K & RTX 2080Ti RGB Gaming System - ROG MAXIMUS XI CODE & STRIX RTX 2080Ti - Phanteks Enthoo Evolv

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the name, I like it. Although might need a little more white like some of the previous builds to do that name justice. For the monitor, it would be either the PG27UQ or PG258Q. One is 4K HDR and the other is 1080P 240Hz. Both really allow the 2080Ti to justify its expensive price tag.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Z390 i7 9700K & RTX 2080Ti RGB Gaming System - ROG MAXIMUS XI CODE & STRIX RTX 2080Ti - Phanteks Enthoo Evolv

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Appreciate the kudos and upvote. For many, the frequency is not needed but wanted to showcase the easy ability to run higher frequency kits on Z series chipsets. Furthermore, you have to love the speeds of the RAM Disk! Regardless if you go with a more basic kit in the 2800 to 3200 you will still have great performance and some impressive RAM Disk speeds just not as fast.

Comment reply on ASUSTECHMKTJJ's Completed Build: Z390 i7 9700K & RTX 2080Ti RGB Gaming System - ROG MAXIMUS XI CODE & STRIX RTX 2080Ti - Phanteks Enthoo Evolv

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the kudos. To clarify on your response which board?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New build drivers"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Steps would be as I noted. Good luck. You will have the option inside the UEFI for built-in updating.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New build drivers"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

You did not note which motherboard you have ( the full model ). For installation, you can use the included disc if you have an optical drive and just select the ASUS utilities and drives. These will be installed in the right order and will reboot when neccesary.

If you want to do it manually I would follow the steps below.

  1. Up the UEFI / BIOS - this can be done if a recent board inside the UEFI enviorment. You can go to the last page and go to tools EZ FLASH 3. As long as you have a Ethernet cord connected you will be able to update the board without anything else it will download the newer UEFI/BIOS and update the board

  2. Installation of core drives.

I generally recommend the order below with reboots inbetween each one

Chipset driver

LAN driver

Audio driver

Graphics driver

MEI driver - if intel

RST driver - if intel

Any remaining drivers and or utilities

Good luck with the build.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "ASUS Z390 Hero XI Wifi board with 9700K?"

  • 9 months ago
  • 3 points

You can feel confident without any issues that the VRM will be able to power the overclock as well as ensure full stability under load. Most of the negative response regarding the design is a lack of clear understanding regarding the choice we made for the design. The design implementation was carefully designed and developed to align with the requirements of Intel's current architecture. You can easily find a way lots of users who have used the board and proved in the real world that it runs without issue. I would also note UEFI ( BIOS ) is equally as important and this is an area ROG boards provide an outstanding experience.

Overclocking as a whole is a combination of the PCB and trace design, VRM design and power components as well as the firmware ( UEFI ) quality. All of these need to be achieved to ensure a smooth & solid overclocking experience.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Z390 VRM heatsinks $150-$200"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

What made you go with the PRO CARBON. Probably late on this response but for the coverage what I personally like to do is use a finger cod and apply evenly across the entire IHS as the viscosity and overall composition varies between compounds the size recommendation an actually vary. This is why my recommendation is about overall clean thin consistent application across the IHS. If you really are super concerned get something like an Innovation Cooling Graphite Thermal Pad - Keep in mind if you get an AIO then no reason to worry at all as they come with TIM pre-applied.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Z390 VRM heatsinks $150-$200"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Coming from a vendor perspective it is important to note that the VRM heatsink design is important but only part of the overall overclocking ability of the board. You have to have the balance of solid VRM components, trace topology, UEFI optimization ( which is key especially for VRM auto rule management and power parameters and much more )

You can have an amazing heatsink but if the underlying power components are not optimally implemented or do not have great efficiency it may only offer middle of the road results. The better the VRM components in generall the less advanced VRM heatsink you need. That being noted better components generally also have more headroom and efficiency allowing for better OC range as such they also benefit from even better heatsink. The point is it is not as simple as just looking at a power with what you think are good heatsinks. In many cases, it is lower in cost to put a bigger heatsink than put higher quality power components.

Beyond this when evlauting a heatisnk it is not just size but points of disipattions which depending on the viewing angle my not awlays be clear. Depending on the design you do not want to just look for mass or fins ( which are important but you have to think across all dimension x,y,z - Well evaluated like this the heatsink may have a lot more overall surface area for dissipation. There are also considerations on how the VRM is designed in regards to which parts operate a higher temperature ( Some part of the VRM target specific portions of power delivery ). Some are for the CPU others for other parts. Furthermore depending on how the PWM controller and BIOS defines the VRM can operate very differently.

An example on ASUS board the VRM can be set to operate with thermal balance for the VRM components or it can be set to operate for power output balance ( at the expense of temperature ). The power phases can be set to operate variably based on load or set to operate fully active always. All this and much more can heavily influencer temperatures.

With this noted if you check out ASUS PRIME Z390-A or STRIX Z390-E you will find very solid VRM design. -A is the optimal choice though based on your requirement for sub 200 pricing.

true 8 phase no phase extenders use of high-performance OptiMos power stages New heatsink design which offers two points of contact ( one for the power stages and another for the inductors/chokes)

Additionally the -E comes with an optional fan and fan mount for the VRM.

I can tell you though from testing it is not needed for general overclocking under gaming loads even at high frequencies ( 5GHz ).

If you really care about thermals then you may want to step to something like a ROG MAXIMUS XI HERO which has much larger heatsinks for more mass and thermal dissipation and also has a heat pipe connecting the two heatsinks. It also uses even higher end inductors.

Overall based on your CPU selection though I would not be concerned. This is especially the case if you are smart about using auto rules in the UEFI and adaptive voltages.

Hope this helps and best of luck with your build.

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