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Kumiko

48 months ago

I actually already looked it up, but I already forgot what it means and it has very low system requirements, so why do people say you need a really nice video card and CPU? I read that the CPU just needs to be a Pentium or Athlon 64 and Video Card must be DirectX 9.0 or 10.0 compatible (128MB VRAM recommended). Seems to be for architects and engineers. :\

Comments

  • 48 months ago
  • 3 points

One of the odd things that I've just noticed recently is that a few of those major CAD programs are single-threaded for a majority of their tasks. AutoCAD (and similar) and SolidWorks are both primarily single-threaded applications. If this is due to wanting to work on legacy equipment without issue, being unable to multi-thread the processes due to their actual task (A needs to be done before B can start) or just not yet getting around to it, I'm not sure...

And just for the heck of it... There's also BIM, which is an offshoot of CAD but incorporates much more data. That's "new" and "upcoming" in the field and should be using much more resources than CAD programs normally do.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 for this observation. I've been trying to convince the engineers at my work that they can get by on i3s for years now, but they keep dropping huge Xeons and i7s into their rigs. Solidworks uses all of those threads only during our FEA runs - which we have a dedicated "supercomputer" for anyway.

For general CAD, you're best off getting a really fast i3, fast storage, a decent amount of RAM, and a decent professional GPU.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the information :)

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

BIM is why building a CAD/BIM computer that you can game on is a little difficult to do on a budget. What works well for BIM is overkill for gaming and what works well for gaming is overkill for BIM.

I've seen many Revit (BIM software) specific benchmarks that are all over the map as far as faster CPU vs more cores, gaming vs workstation GPUs, etc etc. On the tests that apparently CAN use multiple cores like opening, exporting, saving, etc my 3.5GHz quad core workstation destroys my workmate's hexacore 2.0GHz, but other results show 4.xGHz also slower than mine. All with the same amount (but slightly different speeds) of RAM and very similar Quadro GPUs, which shouldn't affect those metrics anyway. It makes it difficult to figure out exactly what to get (which is why I'm here) when you're trying to build both.

[comment deleted]
  • 48 months ago
  • 2 points

Another thing to keep in mind, is that since CAD builds are [generally] workstations, so the less time it takes for a machine to do something like rendering, the less time the user sits around waiting... And a fairly decent workstation is relatively in significant cost wise, vs. salary.

  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for answering :)

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 48 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome, thanks :)

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