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Upgrading my existing CPU that will last me ~5 years

Nabz23

2 months ago

Sup everyone, I want to get your guy's opinions as I havent been following in the computer parts much the past couple years. I was thinking of upgrading some parts to my current build. One of the main things I want to consider is that I want my CPU to perform well for at least 5 years. Something that is good long term.

Currently I am thinking between, a R5 3600 or R7 3700x. I'd like your guys opinions, I game and code and could possibly stream not sure but could happen. So I would say the ratio is 60% gaming, 40% programming. What would you guys recommend and any mobo suggestions ?

My Current build: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/gvyGxG

Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The 3700 will probably perform better in 5 years and will perform better in compiling, but both will probably feel sluggish in 5 years. It's difficult to know how long anything will last in tech, especially given the core wars going on now.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Do you have a budget? More cores will perform better for longer in theory. R9 3950X would be the best option, but that's not cheap.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I would say $700-800 would be my budget. If i get a new cpu I also have to get new mobo, and I'll be upgrading my RAM and power supply

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Upgrading the CPU is unlikely to change your gaming experience at on a 60Hz monitor (outside of the odd single-thread limited game. I play a lot of Kerbal Space Program, and it is CPU limited). I'd guess that programming would benefit, but would probably also benefit from more memory.

Trying to look into the future is tough, especially if you aren't upgrading the GPU+monitor at the same time (you won't notice the CPU improvement for gaming until then, and then likely only if you really care about high-twitch/high frequency gaming). On the other hand, we probably haven't ever had a point in computing where you could say "yes, there probably won't be any huge changes in the next five years. Probably." Frequencies are almost unchanged (AMD is slowly catching up to Intel's limits), numbers of cores may be skyrocketing, but software is slow to use them.

I'd also think twice about cheaping out on a motherboard. While I don't think PCIe4 will be relevant in the next couple of years, you may find it much more important 3-5 years from now. With Micron gaining the ability to sell 3dXP (Optane) on their own, the extra speed might be all but necessary.

Logically, I'd recommend you stand pat. Personally I was in a similar case (although with a Bulldozer CPU, so perhaps a better excuse) and upgraded anyway. Just understand that the only benefit you will likely notice is the chance to try to code to all those threads (I highly recommend producer/consumer systems. Semaphores will simply lead to a mess of hiesenbugs).

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $428.75 @ Vuugo
Motherboard ASRock X570M Pro4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $275.95 @ Vuugo
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $89.99 @ Memory Express
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $104.50 @ Vuugo
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $899.19
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-21 07:54 EST-0500
  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Do you have a cheaper alternative Motherboard suggestion thats still good? I was thinking of the ASRock B450M PRO4

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

B450 Tomahawk Max

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

That is the only mATX board that for sure already has the updated BIOS for the processor.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If you like Asrock, the B450M/AC. Otherwise the MSI B450m PRO-VDH MAX would seem to be your best bet in mATX size. The MSI B450m Mortar MAX would be better if you could find one, which you probably can't. The Tomahawk MAX would be great but it's ATX, not mATX.

The PRO-VDH MAX isn't really ideal for a 3700X but if you have a bit of case airflow going, I think it would be fine.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

One more, the MSI B450m Gaming Plus, doesn't necessarily come with Ryzen 3000 BIOS but it can be updated without a CPU. As long as you have some way to get the relevant BIOS update onto a flash drive, you can update the board.

[comment deleted]
  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Get the ASRock B450M Steel Legend from a major retailer like Amazon and you are virtually guaranteed to get an updated board. The box will say Ryzen 3000 ready on the front. Amazon even shows that on the product images, so if you get one that's not 3000 ready just send it back and get another one.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

One of the main things I want to consider is that I want my CPU to perform well for at least 5 years.

There is no question the CPU will perform in 5 years as it largely would today. The issue of "performing well" is hard to answer given in five years the average/middling CPU could be a 32core 64 thread monster with 5GHz all cores and single threaded scores double or triple what AMD currently have. In 5 years the 3700X could be where the i3-4130 is today - i.e. washed-up, good only for browsing/light tasks. Alternatively the 3700X could be where the i7-4790K is today, i.e. 5 years from the now the 3700X is mostly relevant and up to handling the workloads of tomorrow outside of niche applications (which it is not suited to in any case). Right now, hard to say. Just build a computer for today and worry about tomorrow when and if it comes.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

in that case wouldnt I just get a 3600?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're looking that far ahead, I think I'd want the extra cores. It's unlikely that the demand for more parallelism will abate, since single thread performance is advancing rather slowly.

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