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2700x vs. 3000 series

Low-key-714

2 months ago

Hey everybody! Back again for this community's valued opinion. My local MC has the below bundle for $287.68. The 2700x is going for $160 plus $30 off for the bundle.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $189.59 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus Prime X470-Pro ATX AM4 Motherboard $139.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $329.58
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-06 21:50 EST-0500

I would think the cheapest alternative for the latest CPUs would be the 3600 paired with the x570-P which MC has for $328.76 total (no comparable "bundle" with the 3600)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus PRIME X570-P ATX AM4 Motherboard $149.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $343.99
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-06 21:54 EST-0500

Basically what I am wondering is, combined with a 5700xt, which trio is the better base to build a gaming PC around. I know we are only talking about $40 dollars here, and without getting into to much detail, but using an 8 core processor is very appealing to me. Which would put out higher FPS at 1440p? Which would you prefer to game with over the next 5 years? Thanks again for the help!

Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

3600 has a very slight frame rate advantage if you don't limit performance with graphics settings.

2700X comes with a far better stock cooler, and a choice between Borderlands 3 and Outer Worlds.

Which would you prefer to game with over the next 5 years?

2700X you get the free game, and 3000 series using a double speculative design strikes me as a bad choice currently with everyone trying to come out with performance robbing fixes and they run the risk of double the performance hit.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the that! I didn’t know about the free game and would love for another excuse to play some more borderlands! What do u mean about the speculative design for the 3000 series?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

What do u mean about the speculative design for the 3000 series?

All current CPU speculate at what information is needed next.

You'll see it referred to as branch prediction and prefetch during CPU breakdowns by the company.

Because its guessing what's needed next it faces a limitation to how well it can work usually in the 70% range at highest, AMD went with a dual design to ensure the CPU isn't sitting around waiting on information.

It was discovered awhile back that the entire speculation is shot through with security issues which malware can take advantage of.

These models using two different speculate logics so you double the chances of taking a performance hit at best, and take a double hit at worst.

AMD rolls out almost all their security updates over operating system updates so you don't even know why you suddenly took a performance loss to make matters worse.

With the 2700X being so close behind in performance and having a lower chance to lose performance from fixes it seems the better long term choice to me.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Wow that's a lot to digest and I appreciate taking the time to explain. From what I'm understanding the speculate design of the new CPU's might require security updates to the OS to counter its malware susceptibility, and this might result in unstable performance. Definitely going to be looking into this further thanks!

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Every CPU architecture out currently uses Speculative Execution.

The 3000 series and Intels upcoming dual speculative design are more of a high risk for high rewards option.

And I just don't see the designs aging as well as older and would choose the older model.

You can avoid running into the malware, you really can't avoid Microsoft force updates to fix security issues, and if you can't really see a noticeable difference now that will only get closer as more fixes are rolled out.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

For gaming, the 3600 is the better choice, but not by a lot. Games are making use of more threads, but speed per core is still just as important and the 3600 is faster per core.

Which would put out higher FPS at 1440p?

For CPUs and how many FPS they can put out resolution does not matter.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the info! It’s a tough choice as I will be streaming Netflix and some light video editing with my GoPro, but not necessarily all at once. I am primarily a gamer though trying to keep a low budget build. I think I’m letting the 8 cores and low price distract me from the fact that the 3600 is a better CPU. Probably not the component I want to save money with.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I look at it this way. You probably will build or rebuild your PC every 4-5 years so one can view it being, from an economic viewpoint, a sum total now spread over 5 years. If the cash is tight, put it aside, save some more, then strike. You do not have to swayed by deals now. Deals happen all the time. If you really want 8 cores, and 8 of the fastest cores money can buy, then save up for an extra month or two and buy the 3700X. Who knows, once you have saved the extra $100, it may have a mini sale and you purchase with $30 off MSRP.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

That's honestly a really good point thanks! I'm certainly not in a rush to build and I have available OT at work, might be worth it to just grind and save for the best!

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Also consider ryzen 4000 is said come out on AM4 socket which may well be the end game for AM4 motherboards. I'd likely get less cpu if my budget was full, and upgrade to 4000 or whatever is top dog later. That should have less impact on gaming than GPU choice, unless you do other things with the PC that need cpu power. From what I see the 3000 while newer/better is not a big step in gaming performance. If you want the bleeding edge then you pay for it. Same with x570 while I like good boards it does not seem to have big advantage over x470 unless you have a special use case, so how much extra is it worth? I expect my x470 prime pro to run any 3000 likely 4000 (am4) ryzen no problem, the vrm is good enough/etc. After that the AM4 socket is done. As always look at your budget and the features you want.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks you for the input that's really helpful! I really like the x470 pro and I feel like I would be compromising by spending more money on a technically "cheap" x570 board. Definitely not looking for the "bleeding edge," just to break into the scene and start gaming at 1440p with a noticeable difference in FPS from that of a console.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

X470 was the top chipset until last summer, the Prime pro is a mid level board its basically the ROG x470 board minus a few details but has a nice feature set. Either of those setups would do that with the right GPU, the 8 core is going to do well at things that like more cores. Games keep moving to more cores everyone says 6 required now more or less, I don't know when they will be saying get 8 core.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

One of the 3xxx series goals was to get gaming performances similar to Intel, but the thing it that the 2xxx prices dropped and now you can get awesome processors for softwares that need a lot of performances for a cheap price. So if you don't use a lot of applicative softwares (video editing 3d modeling ..) i recommend taking a 3XXX processor.

But last thing, i saw that you took a X570 board, they usually have good vrms but the price / performance ratio is extremely bad. I recommend buying a "MSI MAX" motherboard , they are already bios-updated to support immediately the 3xxx.

Sorry if my english isn't entirely okay, hope i helped you !

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Your English was perfect thanks for the input! I originally wasn't looking into a b450 board for the 3XXX processor since I wanted to run 3600 RAM. Now that the MAX is out in the US that is now an option since it will support the RAM. A key feature I am looking for in a board, however, is an M.2 heat sink. I've read that the drive I plan on using runs hot and I want to avoid any type of thermal throttling what so ever.

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

You can get add-on m.2 heat sinks Depending on the SSD, they may or may not be helpful. I have one on a Toshiba RD400, I don't think it would thermal throttle regardless but it does keep the temps down by a few degrees.

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