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Is this worth the money as a all around workhorse. I dont want to have to buy anything for a while. Like. 10 years.

Comments

  • 1 day ago
  • 4 points

If you expect 10 years out of the build, do not put a CLC in it.

10 years out of a CLC isn't likely. It'll either leak on your build, stop working due to liquid loss over time, incur pump failure, or some combination of these things in that time frame.

Liquid heatpipes are the industry standard for reliable liquid cooling. You'll find them in servers, on the space station, in enterprise grade workstations and laptops, on the alaska oil pipeline, in mission critical military communications equipment, and you can enjoy all that proven reliability for less than the cost of a CLC.

CLC's are a fad for dealing with thermal density issues that are only a problem when CPU's are operated at overclocked power levels.

The 9700K, if configured with it's factory power limit enforced, can be cooled by a $20 liquid heatpipe cooler just fine. On a larger, $40-80 heatpipe cooler, you can manually configure higher power limits that will keep it operating in the mid 4.4-4.9GHZ range in most workloads. The CLC might let you run with the power limit disabled, maintaining 0.1-0.2GHZ higher average clock speeds, at enormous power cost increases that are just going to wear out the VRM's on the motherboard sooner anyway.

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

K. So. I'm still learning what stuff is. vrm? The little power cell looking things in the shape of an l around the top left of the cpu slot. Correct or no... and how do you oc. And why do you need it? Or when.. I want to make a good pc and I am well aware I will need to eventually replace things. But my main concern in this build is if the GPU is going to artifact. That's what a lot of people I guess have said about rtx cards but I want it so I can appreciate 4k gaming on a oled tv hahaha

  • 17 hours ago
  • 2 points

K. So. I'm still learning what stuff is. vrm? The little power cell looking things in the shape of an l around the top left of the cpu slot.

https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/1229-anatomy-of-a-motherboard-what-is-a-vrm-mosfet?showall=1

and how do you oc.

There are thousands of guides around the internet for this. I would suggest reading/watching some. At a basic level, overclocking can mean either increasing the power envelope of the CPU to allow it to overclock itself higher, or taking manual control of the voltage and clock speeds through BIOS settings or "tuning" applications.

And why do you need it?

You don't need it, it is optional. Modern high end CPU's are basically "self" overclocking near the limits anyway, so there's not much to be gained manually overclocking anymore. On Intel, simply allowing the CPU to operate with more power margin is easy and provides a bump in performance. Most motherboards are coming with this enabled by default anyway.

But my main concern in this build is if the GPU is going to artifact.

Not sure I can help with that. Try picking a GPU that that has a lot of positive feedback from verified buyers with minimal reports of issues like artifacts.

  • 17 hours ago
  • 1 point

Thank you. I will watch the video. What do you think of corsair radiator liquid cooler thing. Is it going to leak on my stuff. And what do you think about the case "lian li 01" I want to get it for pure aesthetic. But its apparantly really good for radiator builds. So i just want to know the lifespan of a water cooler for the cpu and what to look for to prevent any damage from occurring. I appreciate you taking the time to respond so organized as well. How did you manage that??

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

And how long should I expect a watercooler for the cpu to last? Few years at best? Cause my roommate spent hahaha 1500 on a basically outdated pc from best buy with a corsair liquid cpu cooler and it has been leaking on his GPU. How do I assist him in realizing this. Or at best fixing it

  • 17 hours ago
  • 2 points

If we were to graph the life and failure of a thousand CLC's over say, 10 years, we would probably get something close to a bell curve, but with a bit of a spike on the front end from DOA/early failures. Most failures would likely occur in the 5-8 year range, and a few stranglers would hold out to 10+ years.

I think the odds of a CLC still working after 10 years is less than 25%, maybe worse. Just my opinion. The reality is CLC's have only been a mainstream cooling solution for PC's for about the last 5 years or so, so we just haven't seen the data yet on how long they can actually last, but I have pretty good intuition for this sort of stuff and am comfortable with my educated guess.

Consider for a moment.. a car radiator and cooling system.... These systems require fluid maintenance about every 3-5 years, and often require fluid top-ups every 6-24 months depending on use and environment even when working properly. Without regular maintenance the fluid breaks down and stops lubricating the pump. It can also wind up turning corrosive to the system causing leaks and deposit buildup. Even with proper maintenance, pumps, radiators, seals, and hoses all have an average service life of around 10 years or 100,000 miles.

It's worth noting, that in that 10 year, 100,000 mile life, that's only about 5,000 operating hours assuming an average speed of 20MPH. A computer that is turned on for 4 hours a day would accumulate closer to 15,000 operating hours in the same 10 years. Do you think the cheesy little pumps and seals that come on a CLC are going to last 15,000 hours?


Anyway, your roommate should replace that CLC with a regular heat-pipe heat-sink right away.

  • 16 hours ago
  • 1 point

So how do I check to make sure nothing is going to leak? And should i just get a new one every 3 or 4 years and then sell the old one or something? I want to know your opinion on the case though as well. Lian li 011. Please and thanks again for such a well organized message.

  • 14 hours ago
  • 2 points

So how do I check to make sure nothing is going to leak?

Simple:

Don't buy a product that can fail/leak like that.

Liquid heatpipe coolers will last basically forever. Just put a new fan on them when the bearings wear out.

Any of the following:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Cooler Phanteks - PH-TC14PE_BK 78.1 CFM CPU Cooler $84.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Phanteks - PH-TC12DX 68.5 CFM CPU Cooler $59.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-U14S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler $63.75 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Shadow Rock Slim 67.8 CFM Rifle Bearing CPU Cooler $49.80 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Thermalright - TRUE Spirit 140 POWER 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Phanteks - PH-TC14S_BK 68.09 CFM CPU Cooler $44.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Scythe - Mugen MAX 97.18 CFM CPU Cooler $56.72 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D15S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler $79.90 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Thermalright - Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.90 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Thermalright - Le Grand Macho RT 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $79.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Thermalright - Macho X2 Limited Edition CPU Cooler $55.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Scythe - FUMA Rev.B 79 CFM CPU Cooler $46.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Scythe - Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler $54.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $88.09 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock 4 CPU Cooler $74.90 @ Amazon
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-19 22:46 EDT-0400

Some of these, like the D15 from Noctua, are available with 1 or 2 fans. You could buy the 2 fan version but only install the 1 in the middle (they work fine like this), then set the second fan aside as a backup to install if the first one ever wears out. Or just use it as an extra case fan instead.

All of the heatsinks above, use proven reliable, leak free liquid heatpipe technology. No pumps to fail, no surface to surface seals, no permeable materials for the liquid to slowly escape through. Every one of the heatsinks above can go toe to toe with the cooling performance of many popular 140mm-240mm CLCs. In fact, if compared on an equalized decibel for decibel performance scale, these often win.

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Thermalright/Le_Grand_Macho/6.html

Check out the Le Grand Macho there.... performing within 2 degrees of a high end 240mm CLC while operating a full 6dB quieter. Why would anyone pay more for a noisier, less reliable CLC when something like this is available?

  • 3 hours ago
  • 1 point

I've decided air cooling is better. Can I ask you for your personal opinion on the lian li 011 dynamic case

  • 2 days ago
  • 2 points

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $399.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Corsair - H100i PRO 75 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $119.45 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte - Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $179.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $189.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Samsung - 970 Evo Plus 250 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $67.99 @ B&H
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $147.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Asus - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card $769.99 @ Newegg Business
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $99.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $109.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Keyboard Logitech - K780 Wireless Slim Keyboard $59.99 @ Amazon
Mouse Logitech - MX MASTER 2S (Black) Wireless Laser Mouse $68.45 @ Amazon
UPS CyberPower - CP1500AVRLCD UPS $144.95 @ Adorama
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2588.73
Mail-in rebates -$50.00
Total $2538.73
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-17 23:57 EDT-0400

better mouse and keyboard

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

How so? I am utilizing solar power with the first one. I no longer require batteries or the need to plug it in to my pc. The mouse just why. I dont know what's good or bad about mice.

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

this mouse is alot more comfortable if youre right handed

  • 22 hours ago
  • 1 point

You could swap all of that storage for a single cheaper 2TB SSD (Intel 660p) or something and actually save money.

Anyway, whether it'll stay usable for a long time depends what you actually want to do.

  • 21 hours ago
  • 1 point

I have been recommended all those Ssds and I've been questioning why tf I need that many. I will definatley go with one ssd. Is the samsung ssd I have good? I had a 2 tb at the start.

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