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ktran714

2 days ago

So I’m planning to use two-three SSDs (Samsung 970 Pro) for my upcoming build but I’m still confused as to what the RAID levels are and if they’re important or if I have to/should use them. I was originally planning on using each SSD individually to store stuff but I wanna get a little bit more information on the RAID stuff.

Comments

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Raid 0 - Get the space of all 3 drives at once but if one drive fails or drops from the raid all data is lost.

Raid 1 - 2 drives mirrored, get the space of one drive but if one fails you have a copy of everything on the other

Raid 5 - Striping with parody. Basically with 3 drives you get the space of 2 drives and if any one of the 3 drives fails or drops from the raid you don't lose your stuff.

Raid 0 has the fastest speeds, raid 1 is the slowest but still around the speed of a single drive, raid 5 varies in speed but wont be lower than raid 1.

When you see Raid 10 or 50 it is basically a raid 1 array paired with a raid 0 array for 10 and 5 with 0 for 50. There are many more types of raid but those are likely to be the ones you would even consider.

Raid 1 and 5 is important if you have data you don't want to lose but it is no substitute for doing proper backups. Raid 0 isn't really needed in a home environment IMO because of the speed of the NVMe SSDs from samsung are already insanely fast. Raid 0 is more if you are using a temporary scratch disc for professional creation work where it is your source of income and time is money. Even then many do not even bother.

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

So many people don’t even bother with RAID?

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Not really. As long as you backup what is important there really isn't much need to worry about raid. Well for redundancy in case of drive failure then a raid 1 does make sense but the other types of raid (5,6,10,50,60 etc) are if you are doing a home NAS server if you have a TON of stuff to store. LTT and many other tech youtube channels has videos to show what they have done for network storage. LTT even has a petobyte server video. Basically over 1000TB. Most home users never come near that in data needs.

  • 15 hours ago
  • 1 point

It is dying with rotating drives. You really can't RAID NVMe cards without ultra-expensive hardware, and you really have to care about uptime to want to RAID SATA SSDs.

RAID is still more popular with NAS systems, especially homebrew ones. These tend to use rotating drives for large storage outside your PC, and can thus get away with RAID. Another trick is that ZFS allows "scrubbing" RAID to fix errors as they occur. ZFS only works on Linux & BSD boxes, and often found in homebrew NAS systems (it also takes at least 8G RAM, so isn't found in even the fancy consumer NAS boxes).

The important thing is that RAID is all about uptime (well RAID1,5 & 6 are, RAID0 is all about speed and I'd expect it to slow down SSDs). If something really goes wrong with your system you want real backups (which may well be on a NAS system with RAID).

Note that all this "RAID is dying" is only on the consumer level. RAID is really great for a lot of the issues that the big boys face, and scales well with their level of hardware commitment. Just don't expect it to be something you care about unless you hangout with the uncool kids over on https://www.reddit.com/r/DataHoarder/

[comment deleted]
  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

If you don't mind organizing across separate drive letters, that's probably best. RAID 0 (striping) doesn't do much good with SSD, and for NVMe you'd want a very large stripe size anyway because NVMe likes large transfers. The main benefit of using RAID in your case would be to present the SSD's as a single drive letter and spread the load across all of them more or less evenly. It's possible that you might even lose a little bit of performance since big sequential transfers would be split across SSD's in smaller chunks.

The other RAID levels as tetsuclaw suggests are largely for protection against various kinds of hardware failure, and most home users will be better served by doing regular backups instead.

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Well even with a raid 1 or 5 and such it is still recommended to do proper backups anyways. If you lose your motherboard on a hardware raid it can be very difficult if not impossible to get data back.

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Cool

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

I’m sill very noob at a lot of this stuff but how would one back up their pc? USB dive or something?

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

USB drive or an online service like Backblaze. I use inexpensive outboard USB hard drives myself, along with Time Machine for the Macintoshes and an incremental backup shellscript for the linux machine. Presumably there's something similarly useful for Windows.

If you have multiple TB of storage, you may need a different backup strategy, but an external USB drive and an incremental backup solution should work for most home / gaming uses.

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Thanks.

  • 14 hours ago
  • 1 point

Actually I just posted a long story on another thread for why you want off site backup for files you can't replace like family photos and important documents. This comes from a personal story along with pics: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/317531-help-with-raid-on-nas#cx3232344

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