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What exactly is a, "Recertified Replacement,"?

connor333

7 months ago

Had to send in my 1080ti sc2 for an RMA since it was freezing and such, and I'm getting sent back a replacement. I asked if it was refurbished on EVGA and other forums, and the cookie cutter response is always, "recertified replacement."

Okay...so I just want this defined out of curiosity since I like precise details. Am I getting a used gpu that was once RMA'd itself and was repaired to working condition again? A new gpu off of the shelf? I'm sure it's refurbished, but the fact that I can't get an exact answer is interesting to say the least lol.

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Different companies have different policies. A "refurbished" item could refer to a huge number of different issues in the item's history that have since been rectified (to the extent that they verify).

A new gpu off of the shelf?

I'm sure you can imagine that the supply of new units is dwindling.

the fact that I can't get an exact answer is interesting to say the least

They may or may not store information about each particular unit, but probably have no interest in releasing it, since it's in their best interests to list all refurbished ones as if they're the same. Narrowing down the particulars of your unit's history would be difficult. Perhaps a previous owner returned it after something as trivial as a loose fan connector. Some companies even lump in "open-box" items with the refurbs, so perhaps it was a mere case of buyer's remorse or a buyer mistook user error for a DOA unit.

What you can generally expect is that the company performs a cost-benefit analysis on repairs. If they get a card that's critically damaged to the point of potentially needing lots of labor to troubleshoot and repair, they may decide to scrap it for salvageable parts and send out a replacement/refund, depending on the specifics of the situation. As such, it's relatively unlikely that you'd get an incredibly beat-up card that's been restored.

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