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Ryzen 3 or 5?

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Topic

grant04600 1 month ago

Hi. I'm looking to build a gaming PC and I'm not sure if I should go with Ryzen 3 or 5.

On this computer, I'll be playing games such as:

  • Roblox

  • Minecraft

  • Overwatch

  • Rocket League

I will also be using applications such as Photoshop and be storing a good amount of pictures.

I want to be able to have YouTube or Google open while playing games.

I'm trying to make it budget, but I still want all my requirements to be met.

Also, what GPU should I pair it with?

Thanks!

Comments Sorted by:

Gilroar 1 Build 1 point 1 month ago

It would depend on the budget since with your use case you need a decent amount of both storage and RAM as well.

reyna785 1 point 1 month ago

AMD owns the budget market for CPU and GPU.

I think a Ryzen 5 2600 paired with an RX 570 would be just fine. The Ryzen 3 2200G probably would be fine paired with the RX 570 for those games too. I recommend a B450 chipset motherboard.

If you have a Microcenter near you, they have open-box motherboards and good CPU+mobo deals for the 2600 (4 core 8 thread). The 2200G there is only $79 if you go the 4 core 4 thread route. RAM and GPU often better online IMO. Check the build below for an example system that might work well for you. If you already have Windows and a monitor/keyboard/mouse and are going to hard-wire Ethernet, it's close to a $500 build that should do well for you, though upgrading to the Ryzen 2600 might be a very solid upgrade if you do much Photoshopping/multitasking. Also, if you store a lot of pictures, toss in a 3-6TB spinning disk.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor $91.99 @ Walmart
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450M DS3H Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $78.88 @ OutletPC
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $77.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Gigabyte - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Gaming 4G Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg Business
Case Thermaltake - Versa H18 Tempered Glass MicroATX Mini Tower Case $47.20 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - 520 W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $34.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.39 @ OutletPC
Wireless Network Adapter Asus - PCE-AC55BT B1 PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter $33.79 @ Amazon
Monitor Acer - KG221Q 21.5" 1920x1080 75 Hz Monitor $101.68 @ Amazon
Keyboard Microsoft - Desktop 900 Wireless Standard Keyboard w/Optical Mouse $33.76 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $874.55
Mail-in rebates -$65.00
Total $809.55
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-06 11:15 EST-0500
grant04600 submitter 1 point 1 month ago
mark5916 1 point 1 month ago

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $164.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $89.99 @ Walmart
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $86.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston - A400 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $31.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $42.15 @ Amazon
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $55.48 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.49 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fan be quiet! - Pure Wings 2 120 51.4 CFM 120mm Fan $10.99 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $771.95
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-06 12:24 EST-0500
reyna785 1 point 1 month ago

Out of curiosity, any reason you're opting for Team Vulcan RAM over G.skill which is cheaper, or a more expensive motherboard?

Also, OP, if you're considering the Ryzen 5 2600 please do consider Microcenter if it's near you - the 2600 + a DS3H mobo = $199, which is substantial savings over buying online.

mark5916 1 point 1 month ago

Out of curiosity, any reason you're opting for Team Vulcan RAM over G.skill which is cheaper, or a more expensive motherboard?

I don't like that mATX board form Gigabyte because it's very basic.

And i like to make builds with some upgrade ability in mind, as just making the cheapest build possible.

As for the ram, because with this board (ASRock - B450 Pro4), I'm 100% sure thar kit will run at 2933MHz if overclocked.

So that's just my personal choice, as far as a budget build goes.

Because budget doesn't just mean to throw in all the cheapest available components that you can find on the market.

It should be a decent build as well. :)

reyna785 1 point 1 month ago

I have the DS3H, 2200G, 8GB DDR3200 RAM, SATA SSD. I was having some issues, as I actually run a Plex Media Server, Excel, Photoshop, and Chrome, with Youtube usually playing music while I work and wife streaming from Plex. After upgrading my BIOS to the latest version, all of my multi-tasking issues I initially had went away (the BIOS version was almost a year old). So I think for his use case he should be ok.

What upgradability does the B450 Pro4 offer that the DS3H doesn't?

As for the RAM, if it's sold as 2933 or 3000 or 3200 MHz, then it will run at that speed with XMP (DS3H and Pro4 both state they support it); if it doesn't run at the advertised speed, you RMA it. If another stick still doesn't run at that speed, you RMA the board. I have a 3200 MHz kit on the DS3H that runs at 3200 MHz straight away. If it didn't, I'd have RMA'd it.

A real lowest-cost build would have an A3xx series chipset, 8GB 2666 RAM, 2200G without dGPU, and whatever decent 450W PSU is on sale.

There are a lot of shades of gray on what is worth it and what isn't - so certainly if he sees a future need for more expansion slots, drive bays, etc, it may be worth an ATX case.

reyna785 1 point 1 month ago

I was going to mention getting a smaller and cheaper SSD - my build as the 860 which is what I based that list off.

Do you have any other storage? I don't take a ton of pictures, but I'm already at almost 1TB just in pics alone. Not a problem to expand later - the DS3H has 4 SATA plugs.

Personally I think you'll be happy with it, and the nice thing is - when Ryzen 3000 series come out on Zen 2, you can always bump up the CPU easily, and the 2200G will likely still retain some resale value because of the solid 4 core performance and integrated graphics, or you could repurpose it to a home theater PC or SFF PC.

grant04600 submitter 1 point 1 month ago

So you think it's fine? https://pcpartpicker.com/user/grant04600/saved/#view=yjszYJ

Also how many and which type of fans should I get?

reyna785 1 point 1 month ago

I think it's great, it's basically the same as my current computer. There's a good upgrade path for CPU. Plenty of wattage on the PSU to support a moderate GPU upgrade later if you ever need it.

I'll admit I have no clue about the RGB strip you added, whether it's compatible. I also saw the CoolerMaster case you have in your list in person and it does not have a PSU shroud, it has more difficult cable management (no slot for CPU pin on top or the USB/sound cables on bottom), very tight space behind the mobo for cable routing, and the passive ventilation isn't as good as the one in my list, so you may need more aggressive active ventilation depending on your workload. If you're getting it to save a few bucks, I just don't think it's worth it.

And with the Wifi card - if you don't need bluetooth, find another card that just has Wifi, will probably be a little cheaper. Don't forget an SD card reader if you're doing photography.

Edit: Regarding fans, check the other parts list - the be quiet! line is really solid. I'd just grab 1 extra one. The PSU will have its own. The CoolerMaster and ThermalTake come with a rear fan. Adding a single intake fan for the ThermalTake I have in my parts list isn't necessary IMO because it has a wide open front grill. The CoolerMaster has somewhat less intake area, so it probably needs just one intake fan up front.

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