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I want to build my own routers...

LostElement
  • 18 months ago

... but I don’t really know where to start. What the requirements are other than maybe the software.

The router that Time Warner Spectrum gives us is unreliable. It always gives out after a year. I want something reliable (can withstand 24/7 operation of years), efficient (gold efficiency, every penny counts), and high performance.

I also don’t want it sounding like a jet engine, so sufficient cooling and airflow would be nice.

So...

  • Budget - 400-500$. Fairly loose
  • Location - United States
  • Peripherals - no
  • Use - 24/7 Internet Router.
  • OS - Not sure I need one?

Comments

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

I also don’t want it sounding like a jet engine, so sufficient cooling and airflow would be nice.

I have never seen a internet-modem-router with active cooling... all the stuff you can buy here or get from your ISP is passive cooled.

  • 18 months ago
  • 0 points

Well, it gets very hot that way, which subsequently reduces its lifespan.

And keep in mind, I am building one, which is using a PC then using programs to have it act as a router.

I just don’t know what parts would be best for such a task.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, there are CPUs designed for low thermal emission. (T series Intel, for instance -- K is for unlocked, T is for Thermal, I guess...)

I would go with passive cooling as well, and low power consumption (thus low thermal emission).

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Would something like this work? I don't do passive cooling :P. Just a personal rule for me.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium Gold G5400T 3.1GHz Dual-Core OEM/Tray Processor $76.58 @ Newegg Marketplace
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Pure Rock Slim 35.1 CFM CPU Cooler $23.90 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - H310M-HDV Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $53.55 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - NT Series 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory $37.98 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston - A400 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $32.99 @ Newegg Business
Case Cooler Master - N200 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $40.99 @ SuperBiiz
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Platinum 550W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $94.99 @ Newegg Business
Wired Network Adapter Intel - EXPI9402PTBLK-1PK PCI-Express x4 10/100/1000 Mbps Network Adapter $39.00 @ Newegg Marketplace
Wireless Network Adapter Asus - PCE-AC88 PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter $104.74 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $504.72
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-08-14 10:20 EDT-0400
  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Try to find specifications of commercial routers.

For instance, this says "Dual-core 1.7 GHz CPU". So I would imagine you should be fine with way cheaper CPUs than what you've picked.

There are motherboards with dual Ethernet connectors and WiFi as well, in case you want to consider them, instead of a motherboard + a PCIe NIC + WiFi card.

Or as a cheaper alternative, you can get an old PC (e.g. Core 2 Duo old) and turn that into a router. Though they may consume more power on the long run.

That's the other reason for passive cooling: keeping power consumption low (not only the CPU, storage but fans, lights, etc as well).

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Save the hassel and just grab a Netgear. I have had the same router for 3 years never an issue. If you are PC gaming, you should just wire into your modem, but if you want a router - https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833122919&cm_re=netgear_nighthawk-_-33-122-919-_-Product

That is the brand new AD Nighthawk router. Since AD is the technology that just came out, and hasn't really been utilized yet, might as well plan ahead.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Save the hassel and just grab a Netgear.

Every router I've ever had, including netgear, have eventually died in about a year. If I am going to spend 400$ on a router, I might as well figure it out and build my own. At least it'll last far longer and potentially perform better. I would also be able to add my own firewalls and VPNs into it.

I'm tired of constantly buying new routers. They're not reliable in my experience.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

I really have to question what kind of routers you have been buying if they only last a year. Mine runs 24/7 and has never had an issue for 3 years and it was a $70 Netgear. Firewalls and VPNs can all be ran through your computer as well. But to each their own. Should probably go check out Tom's Hardware or someplace for possible guides.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

They're not reliable in my experience.

Maybe you are terribly unlucky or have power spikes in your electric wires at home that destroy your electronic equipment?

Nevertheless, if you want to build one on your own, it should be a good experience. :)

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