Description

This build was a belated father's day/birthday present for my father. He recently moved away from the rest of my family and was feeling pretty isolated and lonely. I made a trip out to him last month to spend a weekend with him, check out his new place, and build him this lovely machine so he had something to use. Prior to this, he was using a 2010 Dell Inspiron 17in laptop as a home PC, and my recently gifted 2013 Dell XPS 13 laptop for travel.

I built this PC with the basics in mind, but I wanted to give it an extra push in case my dad wanted to start filling his time with some old games he used to play, or possibly set up a Plex server. With longevity in mind, I picked some decent parts that I felt would last him at least until retirement.

CPU: I easily could have gotten away with a Pentium of the same generation or even older, but I wanted something that I knew would be overkill for the sake of keeping it for a long time. the 7100 is a champ. It handles everything my dad wants to do with no sluggishness (my dad's complaint with his Inspiron).

Cooler: I'm a huge Cryorig fan (pun intended), so I chose the C7 as a replacement to the Intel stock cooler. It's damn quiet even at 100% fan speed. It's pretty cheap, looks good, and is quieter than stock coolers so it gets a 10/10 in my book!

Motherboard: Honestly, I looked for the cheapest mATX mobo I could find with good reviews. The Skylake boards that I had looked at prior to choosing Kaby Lake had relatively poor reviews, so I bumped the CPU and mobo up to the next generation where I saw better overall performance and stability. I really didn't want to have to do to much maintenance on this PC so stability was important.

RAM: I think this was the cheapest set of 2x4gb that I could find at the time of making the part list. It does what it's supposed.

Storage: I grabbed a cheap(ish) 240gb SSD and a WD Blue for whatever my dad decides he wants to download. Since he works I can only assume that it's old family photos, music and excel spreadsheets. PNY makes some pretty nice looking SSDs and the case window demands nice looking parts!

Case: The Carbide 88R was a pleasure to build in. It's a nice size (smaller than my dad expected) and has enough space to easily build in. The only problem I have is the punch out PCIe covers. I'd be willing to pay slightly more to have normal covers rather than cheap ones I have to break off of the case.

PSU: SeaSonic makes a damn nice and cheap PSU. My only requirement for the PSU was that it was fully modular and under $60. So this was my best option. It's reliable and I'm pretty sure it'll last as long as I need it to.

Wireless Card: The TP Link card was an easy install. Plug and play right after Windows installs. I installed the drivers from their site just in case, but it seemed like it worked well without them.

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Comments

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build and nice images. Its always nice to see people building PCs as gifts for their parents. Adds a nice and warm feel overall. :)

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

I like the CPU cooler!

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice thing you did for your father, he will love it!

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice gesture of yours but I would change some stuff.

Get rid of the TP link, get a cable, faster, cheaper. Get rid of the OS and Software. Get rid of the cooler, the cooler that comes with the CPU is more than enough.

You just saved $281, that you could use to buy a really decent graphics card or monitor.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the feedback. Placement in the house prevented me from using ethernet. My dad's a stickler for the rules as well, so he insisted that I include the price of the software in the build. I know the stock cooler is fine as well. But like I mentioned, the Cryorig is quieter than the stock. I also didn't need a graphics card since my dad doesn't play games! We already had a monitor laying around too. Good advice tho.

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  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Sale of software and keys from that site often violates the ToS or are resold licenses purchased via fraudulent credit card. Recommending, suggesting, advising, encouraging, hinting, or in any way implying these keys as a solution or option is not allowed on this site.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't know which sites you guys are talking about but all the stores I mainly use are completely legal and legit. The keys are cheap because they are OEM versions, which means Microsoft won't solve your problems if you find any, and this key is tied to your motherboard. I guess it's a small price to pay for that.

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

If you are purchasing a Windows key for 10 dollars it is not a legitimate sale/seller and almost definitely violates Microsoft ToS.

OEM keys are not-for-resale and may not be transferred to another computer. They may, however, be transferred with the computer if the computer is transferred to new ownership.