Description

I prefer small, quiet, sleek builds, with tons of RAM, SSDs, and Intel core processors for an awesome all-around computing experience. I'm not gaming or overclocking focused, and usually let stock fans and integrated graphics do their thing (to keep the noise, the profile, and the power requirements low.)

Notes about this build:

  • This build booted on the very first power-up, everything fit well, no surprises.
  • I didn't get a separate GPU, the integrated graphics work great for a linux workstation.
  • I didn't get an optical drive, I booted / installed from a USB stick. You could easily add an optical drive.
  • No monitor, keyboard, or mouse on this list, I already owned those. Any USB keyboard/mouse will work - there are no old-school PS/2 ports.
  • I installed Ubuntu 14.04.1 on the SSDs in RAID0 (requires server installation disc), but you could (with less partitioning hassle) just use one drive.
  • I use this machine with my 27" 2560x1440 Dell U2713HM monitor over displayport - one of the reason I chose this motherboard was the displayport capability.
  • For this build, a friend gave me the cooler, so I decided to try it out.
  • I like the Rosewill Line-M. I've previously used the Rosewill FBM-01 (both small, quiet cases by tower standards.) The Line-M has nicer mounting hardware and USB 3.0 on the front. The Line-M comes with two 120mm case fans - a clear/blue-LED one in front and a plain black on in back. I swapped them as I don't appreciate the blue glow. The black one, however, is a bit loud so I turned it off in the BIOS. I might replace it for a quieter fan.

I use this machine as a Linux workstation - I run lots of terminals, compile projects, browse using Chrome with tons of tabs open, run various services locally for debug (MySQL, MongoDB, web servers, etc.), as well as running VMs for other tasks (Windows 7 with Photoshop for example). A beefy machine like this is a fast and economical way to do all that without a hiccup.

Thanks for a great website, PCPartPicker!

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Comments

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

Clever choices!

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

I thought the 4790K supported a max memory speed of 1600 not 1866 unless you overclock the memory controller

  • 62 months ago
  • 1 point

Interesting, thanks for the note, I'll keep an eye on it. While the BIOS defaulted the ram to 1333 (a safe default), I was easily able to set it to 1866 and have been running that way for a week with no problems.

So perhaps the RAM controller is overclocked. I'm not opposed to overclocking, I just don't make it a priority.

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

you just need to enable XMP profile in bios and ram will run at rated speed.

  • 62 months ago
  • 2 points

Excellent build +1 I like the pictures you have and the parts are well choosen.

  • 61 months ago
  • 1 point

Interesting build. I liked your choices in parts. It made me realize how much I've over paid building mine. You may want to consider a graphics card only because it can take the stress off the cpu, reduces the heat, and can alleviates stress on the ram. The GPU can decrease render times dramatically and make takes in photoshop run faster. In a work station environment every resource is valued. Even the most basic card would help. I personally have your processor in my rig and upgraded it with a graphics card. I noticed a huge difference in the strain on ram when using multiple programs. (*side note: I am using windows 8.1 and I know Ubuntu uses resources differently)

Alas it would be another expense to be added to the list, but keep in mind the possible returns it may yield during your production.

Enjoy your new workstation workstation and may the odds be ever in your favor.

-Cambolicious

  • 61 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the thoughtful note. I have a mid-range graphics card in my home computer that's not powerful enough to really enjoy games, and it's somewhat loud. My older workstation had a low-end card that was less powerful than the integrated graphics (but I needed for driver stability). But it made the OS effects choppy.

So personally, I haven't seen any evidence of the value of a low-to-mid-range dedicated card over integrated graphics, and I can't justify a high-end GPU.

But that's just my opinion and experience for my usage patterns. =) Others' mileage will vary.

Thanks again, -Jeff

  • 61 months ago
  • 1 point

According to Wikipedia, few Linux softwares support gpu acceleration. So integrated graphic is a good choice.

Please take a look at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_Acceleration_API